Category Archives: Graphic Literature

Joss Whedon’s Fray

I was, once uponn a time, one of a mere handful of people who had had no experience of the work of Joss Whedon. The others were, I’m sure, comfortably ensconced in caves in the Himalayas. (I’m a non-TV person. … Continue reading

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What’s New for the 16th of April: “Classical” music: In the beginning. . . .

Musick has Charms to sooth a savage Breast, To soften Rocks, or bend a knotted Oak. William Congreve, The Mourning Bride If music be the food of love, play on. . . . William Shakespeare, Twelfth Night There are many … Continue reading

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What’s New for the 9th of April: choice SF from Elizabeth Bear, live music from Midnight Oil, Ottoman tulips, a history of breakfast and buckdancers choice on other matters

Stars on our door, stars in our eyes, stars exploding in the bits  of our brains where the common sense should have been. — Angela Carter’s Wise Children The tulips such as the one in the vase on my desk here in the … Continue reading

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John Ostrander’s Suicide Squad: Trial by Fire

I first ran across the work of John Ostrander in his collaboration with Gail Simone in Secret Six: Danse Macabre. I had my reservations, but now that I’ve read what may be considered the forerunner to that series, Suicide Squad: … Continue reading

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What’s New for the 19th of March: Spring festivals, wise fools, outlaw heroes, an English country house mystery, chocolate!, and more

“I really didn’t mean to steal it.” Mr. Williams shook his head. He scratched at his chin nervously. “Why not? That’s what they’re there for. Tunes belong to everybody. So do stories.” ― Tallis and Mr Williams in Robert Holdstock’s … Continue reading

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Hyouta Fujiyama’s Ordinary Crush, Vols. 1 & 2

Hyouta Fujiyama has become one of my favorite mangaka doing BL, mostly because of her strong, clean graphics and charming stories. (For some general remarks on BL, see my comments on Dash!.) In Ordinary Crush we have the core of … Continue reading

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Isaku Natsume’s Dash!

Isaku Natsume’s Dash represents an excellent example of the genre in shoujo manga (“manga for girls”) known in Japan as BL (boys’ love), bishonen-ai or shonen-ai, or, as is generally the case in the West, yaoi (pronounced, if one is … Continue reading

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Robert Venditti and Brett Weldele’s The Surrogates: Flesh and Bone

Flesh and Bone is a prequel to The Surrogates, taking the story back fifteen years to the anti-surrogate riots of 2039. The incident that sparks the crisis is the beating death of a derelict by three teenagers who are using … Continue reading

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Robert Venditti and Brett Weldele’s The Surrogates

Robert Venditti’s The Surrogates, drawn by Brett Weldele, is right up among the top graphic works I’ve run across recently. Set in a near-future megalopolis, it’s a fast-moving crime drama with a couple of unique twists. The central motivator in … Continue reading

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What’s New for the 19th of February: music from Nick Burbridge, a Fairport Convention review from twenty years ago, live music from McDermott’s 2 Hours, essays on children’s lit, chocolate bars, A Cold War thriller and other matters

 Some stories are literally true; some of them are figuratively true; some of them are wrong. That’s the nature of stories, isn’t it? They show us all the highlights of the world, but they never leave us certain we can … Continue reading

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