Tag Archives: superheroes

Mike Mignola and John Arcudi’s Abe Sapien: The Devil Does Not Jest and Other Stories

Among the many spin-offs from Mike Mignola’s Hellboy is the series Abe Sapien, relating the exploits of the eponymous hero, the amphibious man introduced as part of the B.P.R.D. This collection, The Devil Does Not Jest, is the second Abe … Continue reading

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Jay Oliva’s Justice League Dark

Once I got started on the Justice League Dark comic, I had to go back and check out the 2017 animated film. If anyone is expecting a film version of the new comic series, guess again: the film was released … Continue reading

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James Tynion IV’s Justice League Dark, #1-2

First, a disclaimer: I almost never read single-issue comics, for reasons that will become clear. Secondly, I haven’t been following DC’s Justice League Dark, a series first introduced in 2011. In fact, I have to confess to not being a … Continue reading

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Allan Heinberg’s Avengers: The Children’s Crusade

As our story opens, the Young Avengers are battling the Sons of the Serpent, a paramilitary group (read “militia”) devoted to racial and moral purity — their words, not mine — when Captain America, Iron Man, and Ms. Marvel show … Continue reading

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Allan Heinberg’s Young Avengers

After reading Civil War: Young Avengers & Runaways, I decided that Young Avengers was one series I definitely wanted to follow up on. It was worth it. The story starts with the “Sidekicks” story line, and a full-page frame of … Continue reading

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James Asmus’ Quantum and Woody! Vol. 1: The World’s Worst Superhero Team

I’ll be very honest here: James Asmus’ Quantum and Woody! had me at the cover. How can you beat “The World’s Worst Superhero Team”? (And yes, there’s a goat.) Derek Henderson is a physicist who has been working on some … Continue reading

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DC’s Justice League Action

Justice League Action is the latest animated series to be set in the DC universe. Unlike earlier series that were roughly twenty two to twenty four minutes long and had seasons of no more that twenty or so episodes, this … Continue reading

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Gerard Way and Gabriel Ba’s The Umbrella Academy: Dallas

Gerard Way and Gabriel Ba have come up with what is one of the most original “superhero” series I’ve seen: The Umbrella Academy. It’s a group, all young, who have powers of one sort or another, but don’t look for … Continue reading

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Joss Whedon’s Fray

I was, once uponn a time, one of a mere handful of people who had had no experience of the work of Joss Whedon. The others were, I’m sure, comfortably ensconced in caves in the Himalayas. (I’m a non-TV person. … Continue reading

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Joss Whedon’s The Avengers

I’m generally not a big fan of translating superhero comics to live-action films. Christopher Nolan’s Batman films, so far, have tended to collapse under their own weight. Bryan Singer’s X-Men should have been titled Wolverine, and was a waste of … Continue reading

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Keith Giffen’s Lobo: 100 Page Spectacular

Lobo is another of those DC characters with a somewhat checkered past. Introduced in 1983 as a hardened villain (with, in that incarnation, a short shelf life), he was resurrected in the early ’90s as one of a growing number … Continue reading

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Geoff Johns and Ivan Reis’ Blackest Night/Geoff Johns and Peter J. Tomasi’s Brightest Day, Vol. 1

Blackest Night and Brightest Day mark another DC “crossover event” in which pretty much everyone gets reinvented. These have become almost a requirement in superhero comics, I suspect because of the periodic necessity of reconciling the various universes occupied by … Continue reading

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Grant Morrison’s Batman: The Return of Bruce Wayne

Batman has probably been rethought and retooled more than any other superhero, and The Return of Bruce Wayne, a six issue mini-series here collected in a hardback edition, gives us an extended reconstruction as Wayne works his way through history … Continue reading

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Tony Bedard and Kevin VanHook’s Oracle: The Cure

You don’t really need tights and a cape to be a superhero. You don’t need super strength or mutant abilities. You don’t even have to have your body surgically or chemically altered. (Willingly or otherwise.) Mind, these things don’t hurt, … Continue reading

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Alexander Irvine and Tomm Coker’s Daredevil Noir

One has come to expect tight, absorbing writing from Alexander Irvine, and one is not disappointed in the Daredevil installment of the Marvel Noir series. Daredevil is not one of those superheroes who’s been very much on my radar, so … Continue reading

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Diana Schutz and Tim Sale’s Grendel: Devil Child

Devil Child, written by Diana Schutz and drawn by Tim Sale, tells the story of Hunter Rose’s adopted child, Stacy Palumbo, and the birth of her daughter, Christine Spar, who became the next Grendel. The story is a narrative by … Continue reading

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Matt Wagner’s Batman/Grendel

Matt Wagner did two crossover series, the first a joint effort between Comico, his publisher at the time, and DC Comics, and the second between Dark Horse and DC, to bring together Grendel and Batman. In the first mini-series, originally … Continue reading

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Matt Wagner’s Grendel: Devil Quest

Matt Wagner’s Grendel has been a phenomenally successful series practically from its beginning in Comico’s Primer in 1982. Due to the vicissitudes of the comics industry, however, it’s been somewhat sporadic. Despite that, it has become successful enough, and important … Continue reading

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Matt Wagner’s Grendel: Devil by the Deed

Matt Wagner’s Grendel, as I’ve mentioned before, was in many ways revolutionary. In spite of the initial, mostly negative, reaction, it proved to be one of the milestones in the development of comics as a form. Some of the thematic … Continue reading

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Paul Dini, Dustin Nguyen, and Derek Fridolfs’ Batman: Streets of Gotham: Hush Money

Streets of Gotham: Hush Money is another installment in the Batman Reborn series (or should I call it a “universe”?), and another in which Tommy Elliott, the villain Hush and Bruce Wayne’s good friend and bitter enemy, plays a large … Continue reading

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Paul Dini and Carlos D’Anda’s Batman: Arkham City

Splashed across the bottom of the dust jacket to Arkham City is “The lead-in to the highly anticipated video game!” Let that be a warning. Batman and the Joker got into it in a big way a year ago, with … Continue reading

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Paul Dini and Guillem March’s Gotham City Sirens: Union

Gotham City Sirens is another installment of Batman Reborn and, like Batman and Robin, it seems to be marking time until something significant happens, somewhere. Catwoman is rescued from an encounter with Boneblaster, Gotham’s latest would-be crime star, by Poison … Continue reading

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Andy Diggle and Jock’s Green Arrow: Year One

To re-invent an ongoing character who has been in existence since 1941 is no small undertaking, although in the case of Green Arrow, a/k/a Ollie Queen, there was a lot of history to draw on — this is not the … Continue reading

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Andy Lanning, et al.: The Authority: Rule Britannia

The Authority: Rule Britannia is the second part of Wildstorm’s World’s End series. By this time, the world is pretty much of a mess: the Carrier is grounded in the city of London — now “Unlondon” — to which its … Continue reading

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Peter David, et al: Young Justice: A League of Their Own/Sins of Youth

Young Justice is, as you might expect, a DC superhero team of young heroes, who originally appeared as a one-off, Young Justice: The Secret. The core group were Superboy, Robin, and Impulse, who are featured in the first part of … Continue reading

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Mike Costa, et al.: Blackhawks, Vol. 1: The Great Leap Forward

Mike Costa’s Blackhawks represents not so much a reboot of the Blackhawk Squadron, the international team of fighter pilots that debuted in 1941, as a complete remake — really, from the ground up. The new Blackhawks are a top-secret black … Continue reading

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Renny Harlin’s The Legend of Hercules

Once upon a time, after having been pretty much housebound for most of a week, I decided to go to the movies and wound up seeing The Legend of Hercules. No particular desire on my part to see it, but … Continue reading

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James Gunn’s Guardians of the Galaxy

If you’re longing for a superhero/science fiction action-adventure film that doesn’t take itself too seriously, Guardians of the Galaxy is it. I’ll readily admit that I’m not terribly enthusiastic about action-adventure films that take themselves without a grain of salt, … Continue reading

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Danny Bilson, et al.: Red Menace

The collected Red Menace revisits the early 1950s, the heyday of Joe McCarthy and HUAC, when America was paranoid about commie plots and demagogues like McCarthy destroyed lives without much regard for facts. One target was L.A.’s own caped crusader, … Continue reading

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Zack Snyder: Man of Steel

It seems to be the Time of the Reboot. Or the retelling. In the case of Zack Snyder’s Man of Steel, it’s once again the Superman story, from Day One. The story in Man of Steel relates how the infant … Continue reading

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Adam Beechen, Ryan Benjamin, and John Stanisci’s Batman Beyond: Hush Beyond

I’m having a hard time keeping track of all the Batman variants popping up every time I turn around. This time, we’ve got 16-year-old Terry McGinnis, working under the tutelage of the retired and semi-invalid Bruce Wayne in an adventure … Continue reading

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Adam Beechen, Ryan Benjamin, and John Stanisci’s Batman Beyond: Industrial Revolution

You may find this hard to swallow, but there is actually a Batman series out there that I like. In fact, I think it’s pretty good. It’s Batman Beyond, from the team of Adam Beechen, Ryan Benjamin, and John Stanisci, … Continue reading

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Alan Taylor: Thor: The Dark World

In spite of what you may have heard, sequels aren’t always bad. Indeed, sometimes they are better than the originals. Case in point: Alan Taylor’s take on the Thor franchise for Marvel, Thor: The Dark World. Once, before the time … Continue reading

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Kenneth Branagh, Joss Whedon (uncredited): Thor

Kenneth Branagh’s Thor was one of the first wave of Marvel Universe superhero movies, and I admit I didn’t see it until much after its release – thanks to Netflix. There was war between Asgard and the Frost Giants of … Continue reading

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