Tag Archives: science fiction

Roger Zelazny’s Isle of The Dead

Roger Zelazny’s Isle of The Dead is a prequel of sorts to To Die in Italbar, though you don’t really need to read it first. It amuses me that, as I noted in reviewing thItalbar, Zelazny considers it be his … Continue reading

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Poul Anderson’s Orion Shall Rise

But only poets recognize myths for what they are, and who really listens to poets? — Poul Anderson in Orion Shall Rise As a general rule, I find Poul Anderson’s writing to be stilted and not very fluent, so that … Continue reading

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Roger Zelazny’s To Die in Italbar

What if you could cure any disease with but a touch? And what if that same touch could turn an entire city into a charnel house? Mr. H, who needs only to touch someone to heal or kill them, is … Continue reading

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James Gunn’s Inside Science Fiction

It’s interesting to see the history of something as told by some of the people who made it. In the case of James Gunn’s Inside Science Fiction, the “something” is, indeed, science fiction, and Gunn was one of the history … Continue reading

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Alexander C. Irvine’s The Life of Riley

Take Escape from New York, mix in an echo of A Mirror for Observers and a generous helping of The Book of Revelations as interpreted by your worst nightmare, and focus very tightly on the crisis point. You’re coming close … Continue reading

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Simon R. Green’s The Dark Side of the Road

The first thing you need to know is that all of the fiction that Green has done over the past several decades is interconnected, with shared characters and settings. Some of the series are deeply interwoven, some connected just enough … Continue reading

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Muriel Jaeger’s The Man with Six Senses

Muriel Jaeger’s The Man with Six Senses is a mostly forgotten piece of fascinating early 20th century science fiction recently brought back to the fore by the British Library. A first person narrative looking back at a set of events surrounding … Continue reading

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Robert Charles Wilson’s Julian Comstock: A Story of 22nd Century America

When I reviewed Robert Charles Wilson’s Julian, I remarked that it felt “truncated, as though it were the beginning of a much longer and more complex narrative.” It was. The novella has reappeared as the first part of Wilson’s Julian … Continue reading

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Robert Charles Wilson’s Julian

Robert Charles Wilson is another of those writers I have only recently discovered, this time through the engaging and provocative novella Julian. Suppose that the bulk of North America, now one nation, were effectively (and quite openly) “under God,” a … Continue reading

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Jane Frank’s Science Fiction and Fantasy Artists of the Twentieth Century: A Biographical Dictionary

Jane Frank’s Science Fiction and Fantasy Artists of the Twentieth Century is a successor volume to Robert Weinberg’s Biographical Dictionary of Science Fiction and Fantasy Artists, published in 1988. Given the labor-intensive quality of a project such as this one, … Continue reading

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Otherworld Theatre Company’s Generation Red

Early in February I went to see the first full production of Generation Red, a science fiction play by Alexander Utz, at Chicago’s Otherworld Theatre Company on Clark Street near Irving Park Road, across the street from the gloriously spooky … Continue reading

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Gary K. Wolfe’s Eight Classic Science Fiction Novels of the 1960s

The Library of America’s Science Fiction: Eight Classic Novels of the 1960s is another impressive feat by editor Gary K. Wolfe. As he explains in his introductions, stories in this two volume slipcase set were chosen both for quality and … Continue reading

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Mike Resnick and Joe Siclari (editors), WorldCon Guest of Honor Speeches

The World Science Fiction Convention is the most venerable of all the various annual gatherings of SF fandom, and it’s arguably the most important of them all, as it is at each Worldcon that the highest awards in SF, the … Continue reading

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Mike Resnick’s Santiago: A Myth of the Far Future

“They say his father was a comet and his mother a cosmic wind, that he juggles planets as if they were feathers and wrestles with black holes just to work up an appetite. They say he never sleeps, and that … Continue reading

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C. J. Cherryh’s Rider at the Gate

C. J. Cherryh is known mainly as a science-fiction writer who sometimes writes fantasy. And then there are the times that she seems to be doing both at the same time. Rider at the Gate, the first of her Finisterre … Continue reading

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C. J. Cherryh’s Cloud’s Rider

Cloud’s Rider, the second of C. J. Cherryh’s Finisterre novels, takes up where Rider at the Gate left off: Danny fisher is taking Brionne, Carlo and Randy Goss, the only survivors of Tarmin village, to Evergreen, the next village up … Continue reading

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C. J. Cherryh and Jane S. Fancher’s Alliance Rising

Alliance Rising is approximately the umpteenth book set in Cherryh’s Alliance-Union Universe, a space opera series that starts on near-future Earth and extends far into the future and a good way into our galactic neighborhood. It takes place, as the … Continue reading

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Arkady Martine’s A Memory Called Empire, Book One of the Teixcalaanli Empire series

First I must note that I now can only experience novels in audiobook format as two years ago I suffered severe head trauma that rendered my ability to follow a written narrative of any reasonable length impossible. I can read … Continue reading

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Joel Dane’s Cry Pilot

Military SF has a long history and more than one tradition, complicated by the issues of patriotism and war. Some are in the business of glorifying one or both of these, others are dismissing one or both as folly. Joel … Continue reading

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Neal Stephenson’s Reamde

I’ve liked everything I’ve read by Seattle speculative fiction writer Neal Stepehson, starting with Snow Crash and The Diamond Age but haven’t kept up with him since 2010’s Anathem. With a new book out in 2019 that is apparently a … Continue reading

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Hajime Yatate and Shinichiro Watanabe’s Cowboy Bebop Remix

Given my delight with Cowboy Bebop: The Movie, it’s probably no surprise that I decided to go whole-hog and plump down for the complete TV series. As it turns out, Cowboy Bebop Remix is something of a mixed bag. The … Continue reading

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Joshua Dysart’s Harbinger: Volume 1, Omega Rising

Peter Stanchek is gifted, and not necessarily in a good way: he’s able to make people do what he tells them, among other things, but there’s a downside to that: he’s a kid, one who has good impulses — as … Continue reading

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Martha Wells’ All Systems Red

All Systems Red is the first book in Martha Wells’ series “The Murderbot Diaries.” It’s a highly entertaining series of novellas set in a distant semi-dystopian future in which bots and borgs and other kinds of artificially intelligent constructs do … Continue reading

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Elizabeth Bear’s Ancestral Night

Haina, Singer and Connla, plus the cats Mephistopheles and Bushyasta, are the inhabitants  of the boat without a name. Oh, it has a registration number but not a name. Haina considers them a family. Not sure what the cats think the five … Continue reading

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Paul Cornell and Miguel Sepulveda’s Stormwatch Vol. 1: The Dark Side

It’s significant of something or other that so much in comics and comics-related work in recent years stresses “the Dark.” One of those is DC’s new version of Stormwatch, titled The Dark Side, which is something of a prequel to … Continue reading

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Roland Emmerich’s Stargate

Stargate presented a bit of a problem for me — it became a “cult film”, which is something I usually tryd to avoid, but it was a) science fiction, and b) somewhat out of the ordinary. So, I picked up … Continue reading

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Lisa Yaszek’s The Future Is Female!

The Future is Female! represents The Library of America’s continued efforts to provide authoritative volumes on any given subject. This is a large collection, featuring twenty five stories that show a wide rang of fiction. In addition, there are notations … Continue reading

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Christopher Moore, Ian Corson, and Jennyson Rosero’s The Griff

The Griff, scripted by Christopher Moore and Ian Corson, and drawn by Jennyson Rosero, is a story of the Apocalypse, told while said Apocalypse is happening. It was developed, we are told, from the script for a film — Corson … Continue reading

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Brian K. Vaughan and Fiona Staples’ Saga, Volume 1

The very helpful and knowledgeable young man at my local comics store directed me to Brian K. Vaughan’s Saga, which is one of the more bizarre examples of graphic lit I’ve run across recently. Marko and Alana are — or … Continue reading

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Euros Lyn’s Torchwood: Children of Earth

I considered doing a review of Season Two of Torchwood, to follow up on my review of the first season, but that’s essentially more of the same, except that it gets steadily darker. However, “Season Three” (in quotes for reasons … Continue reading

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Russell T. Davies’ Torchwood: Season One

I had heard of Torchwood, the Dr. Who spin-off, some years ago, and then discovered it online at Netflix. That constituted my binge-watching for a while. The basic set-up is related in John Barrowman’s voice-over for the opening theme: “Torchwood: … Continue reading

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Charles de Lint’s Svaha

Svaha is Charles de Lint’s science-fiction novel. It seems that every fantasy writer must write at least one science-fiction novel, just as every science fiction writer must experiment with fantasy of one sort or another. As a dystopian, post-Apocalypse science … Continue reading

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Clifford D. Simak’s City

To one who grew up on science fiction (and I really did — the first book I ever bought all on my own was The Big Book of Science Fiction, edited by Groff Conklin; I think that was about fifth … Continue reading

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George R. R. Martin and Gardner Dozois’ Songs of the Dying Earth: Stories in Honor of Jack Vance

Anyone who doubts the pervasive and ongoing influence of Jack Vance need only look at the table of contents to this tribute volume. Many of the contributors are legends themselves (Glen Cook, Neil Gaiman, Tanith Lee, Robert Silverberg); others are … Continue reading

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J. J. Abrams’ Star Trek: Into Darkness

I’ve sort of lost track of Star Trek, after being glued to the TV every week in my younger days, as Gene Rodenberry’s original series was airing. Strangely enough, the last Star Trek movie I saw was The Wrath of … Continue reading

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C.J.Cherryh’s Chanur’s Legacy

Chanur’s Legacy is a pendant volume to C. J. Cherryh’s great Chanur Saga, possibly one of the most engaging science-fiction series ever written. It’s a new universe — well, partly new. The story begins some years after the end of … Continue reading

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C. J. Cherryh’s The Chanur Saga; Chanur’s Homecoming

C. J. Cherryh’s The Chanur Saga is an almost-omnibus edition of her tetralogy about Pyanfar Chanur and her ship, the interstellar trader The Pride of Chanur. Because of length, the “omnibus” volume contains the first three in the series (The … Continue reading

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Simone Caroti’s The Culture Series of Iain M. Banks: A Critical Introduction

I don’t know about you, but I love reading things written by other people about things I like. Well, actually, I do know about you. You wouldn’t be reading The Green Man Review if you also didn’t like to read … Continue reading

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Vernor Vinge’s Rainbows End

I’m not sure that Vernor Vinge’s Rainbows End counts as cyberpunk, although it might seem like it at first glance. The “cyber” part is there in full measure. Vinge envisions a world in the not-so-distant future in which clothes are … Continue reading

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Jack Vance’s Tales of the Dying Earth

Jack Vance has been, throughout his long career as a science-fiction writer, one of the most consistently creative universe-builders in the field. From the far-flung stellar civilization of The Demon Princes to Alastor and The Dying Earth, his creations are … Continue reading

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Jack Vance’s Hard Luck Diggings: The Early Jack Vance

Hard Luck Diggings collects fourteen of Jack Vance’s earliest published stories, originally appearing between 1948 and 1959. As editors Terry Dowling and Jonathan Strahan point out in their Introduction, what we see here is Vance not only mastering his craft, … Continue reading

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Kerry Conran’s Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow

This review was written by Rebecca Scott. The hype began months ago. The first I knew of it was the full-page ads in my monthly comics. Then I caught the teaser on Apple’s site. The concept caught me immediately: a … Continue reading

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Kerry Conran’s Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow

I’m not sure when or where I first ran across Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow, but it has become one of my favorite “something to watch when I’m just up for some light entertainment” movies. (This is not … Continue reading

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Jack Vance’s The Kragen; Thomas M. Disch’s The Voyage of the Proteus: A Eyewitness Account of the End of the World; Cat Rambo and Jeff VanderMeer’s The Surgeon’s Tale and Other Stories

You may recall that we here at GMR are extraordinarily fond of the small presses that publish so many of the things we discuss. We are fond of them because they bring us all-but-forgotten classics, exciting new works from important … Continue reading

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Ursula K. Le Guin’ Always Coming Home

Some fifteen years ago, Le Guin created Always Coming Home, an ethnographic history of a people living in a future version of Northern California. Though it’s possible that this might be a far future version of our culture, Le Guin … Continue reading

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Octavia E. Butler’s Lilith’s Brood (Dawn, Adulthood Rites, Imago)

Octavia E. Butler, at the time of her emergence as a major voice in science fiction, was a rarity because she was a woman and she was African-American. In neither area was she unique, but the combination was. Lilith’s Brood, … Continue reading

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Octavia E. Butler’s The Parable of the Sower; The Parable of the Talents

The late Octavia E. Butler is one of those science fiction writers whose work can — and does — stand easily in the company of the very best “mainstream” literature being produced today. She is, I regret to say, another … Continue reading

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Roger Zelazny’s Damnation Alley

It’s a truism at this point that if you don’t know the work of Roger Zelazny, you are not equipped to deal with contemporary science fiction. Zelazny is often given major credit for reshaping the genre as one of the … Continue reading

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Roger Zelazny’s Creatures of Light and Darkness

Roger Zelazny’s Creatures of Light and Darkness is one of the more bizarre science fiction novels in the canon. I should point out that before the advent of the New Wave writers in the 1960s, science fiction reserved its adventurousness … Continue reading

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Carol Emshwiller’s The Secret City

Carol Emshwiller is one of those writers who seems to have been a closely guarded secret until recently. With the emergence of slipstream fiction, she is becoming more and more of a household word (in some households, at least) and, … Continue reading

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