Tag Archives: science fiction

Clifford D. Simak’s City

To one who grew up on science fiction (and I really did — the first book I ever bought all on my own was The Big Book of Science Fiction, edited by Groff Conklin; I think that was about fifth … Continue reading

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George R. R. Martin and Gardner Dozois’ Songs of the Dying Earth: Stories in Honor of Jack Vance

Anyone who doubts the pervasive and ongoing influence of Jack Vance need only look at the table of contents to this tribute volume. Many of the contributors are legends themselves (Glen Cook, Neil Gaiman, Tanith Lee, Robert Silverberg); others are … Continue reading

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J. J. Abrams’ Star Trek: Into Darkness

I’ve sort of lost track of Star Trek, after being glued to the TV every week in my younger days, as Gene Rodenberry’s original series was airing. Strangely enough, the last Star Trek movie I saw was The Wrath of … Continue reading

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C.J.Cherryh’s Chanur’s Legacy

Chanur’s Legacy is a pendant volume to C. J. Cherryh’s great Chanur Saga, possibly one of the most engaging science-fiction series ever written. It’s a new universe — well, partly new. The story begins some years after the end of … Continue reading

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C. J. Cherryh’s The Chanur Saga; Chanur’s Homecoming

C. J. Cherryh’s The Chanur Saga is an almost-omnibus edition of her tetralogy about Pyanfar Chanur and her ship, the interstellar trader The Pride of Chanur. Because of length, the “omnibus” volume contains the first three in the series (The … Continue reading

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Simone Caroti’s The Culture Series of Iain M. Banks: A Critical Introduction

I don’t know about you, but I love reading things written by other people about things I like. Well, actually, I do know about you. You wouldn’t be reading The Green Man Review if you also didn’t like to read … Continue reading

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Vernor Vinge’s Rainbows End

I’m not sure that Vernor Vinge’s Rainbows End counts as cyberpunk, although it might seem like it at first glance. The “cyber” part is there in full measure. Vinge envisions a world in the not-so-distant future in which clothes are … Continue reading

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Jack Vance’s Tales of the Dying Earth

Jack Vance has been, throughout his long career as a science-fiction writer, one of the most consistently creative universe-builders in the field. From the far-flung stellar civilization of The Demon Princes to Alastor and The Dying Earth, his creations are … Continue reading

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Jack Vance’s Hard Luck Diggings: The Early Jack Vance

Hard Luck Diggings collects fourteen of Jack Vance’s earliest published stories, originally appearing between 1948 and 1959. As editors Terry Dowling and Jonathan Strahan point out in their Introduction, what we see here is Vance not only mastering his craft, … Continue reading

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Kerry Conran’s Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow

This review was written by Rebecca Scott. The hype began months ago. The first I knew of it was the full-page ads in my monthly comics. Then I caught the teaser on Apple’s site. The concept caught me immediately: a … Continue reading

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Kerry Conran’s Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow

I’m not sure when or where I first ran across Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow, but it has become one of my favorite “something to watch when I’m just up for some light entertainment” movies. (This is not … Continue reading

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Jack Vance’s The Kragen; Thomas M. Disch’s The Voyage of the Proteus: A Eyewitness Account of the End of the World; Cat Rambo and Jeff VanderMeer’s The Surgeon’s Tale and Other Stories

You may recall that we here at GMR are extraordinarily fond of the small presses that publish so many of the things we discuss. We are fond of them because they bring us all-but-forgotten classics, exciting new works from important … Continue reading

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Ursula K. Le Guin’ Always Coming Home

Some fifteen years ago, Le Guin created Always Coming Home, an ethnographic history of a people living in a future version of Northern California. Though it’s possible that this might be a far future version of our culture, Le Guin … Continue reading

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Octavia E. Butler’s Lilith’s Brood (Dawn, Adulthood Rites, Imago)

Octavia E. Butler, at the time of her emergence as a major voice in science fiction, was a rarity because she was a woman and she was African-American. In neither area was she unique, but the combination was. Lilith’s Brood, … Continue reading

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Octavia E. Butler’s The Parable of the Sower; The Parable of the Talents

The late Octavia E. Butler is one of those science fiction writers whose work can — and does — stand easily in the company of the very best “mainstream” literature being produced today. She is, I regret to say, another … Continue reading

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Roger Zelazny’s Damnation Alley

It’s a truism at this point that if you don’t know the work of Roger Zelazny, you are not equipped to deal with contemporary science fiction. Zelazny is often given major credit for reshaping the genre as one of the … Continue reading

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Roger Zelazny’s Creatures of Light and Darkness

Roger Zelazny’s Creatures of Light and Darkness is one of the more bizarre science fiction novels in the canon. I should point out that before the advent of the New Wave writers in the 1960s, science fiction reserved its adventurousness … Continue reading

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Carol Emshwiller’s The Secret City

Carol Emshwiller is one of those writers who seems to have been a closely guarded secret until recently. With the emergence of slipstream fiction, she is becoming more and more of a household word (in some households, at least) and, … Continue reading

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Luis Ortiz’ Emshwiller: Infinity x Two — The Art and Life of Ed and Carol Emshwiller

“I like the idea of going through different careers. It’s like being reborn a number of times.” That is probably the best summation of Ed Emshwiller’s life, from the horse’s mouth. Known to science-fiction fans of the 1950s, ’60s and … Continue reading

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Kage Baker’s The Machine’s Child

The Machine’s Child is, unless I have lost count somehow, the ninth episode in Kage Baker’s ongoing series of the Company, the shadowy organization that has a lock on time travel and is using it to loot the past. This … Continue reading

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Thomas M. Disch’s The Wall of America

Thomas M. Disch was one of the more challenging of the American New Wave science-fiction writers. Where writers such as Roger Zelazny and Samuel R. Delany were pushing the boundaries of the formally acceptable in science fiction (and fantasy, for … Continue reading

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Roger Zelazny’s The Doors of His Face, the Lamps of His Mouth and Other Stories

Although he published his first story in the early 1950s, Roger Zelazny didn’t really impact the science fiction scene until 1963. That’s when I remember reading “A Rose for Eccelsiastes” in The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction (with their … Continue reading

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Glen Cook’s Passage at Arms

This edition of Glen Cook’s Passage at Arms is a reissue of one of his early science-fiction novels, first published in 1985. Those who know Cook from The Black Company or Garrett P.I. may be surprised to learn that he … Continue reading

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Glen Cook’s Stars’ End

Glen Cook brings his Starfishers Trilogy to a close with Stars’ End, tying up all the loose ends involving Masato Igarashi Storm, Moyshe benRabi, the Confederation Navy, the Sangaree, and the High Seiners, the Starfishers. Well, pretty much. This being … Continue reading

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Glen Cook’s Starfishers

Starfishers continues the story of Masato Igarashi Storm and his vendetta against the Sangaree begun in Shadowline. Compared to its predecessor, it’s a very different kind of story.

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Glen Cook’s Shadowline

Glen Cook dedicated Shadowline, the first volume of his Starfishers trilogy, to Richard Wagner. Yes, that Richard Wagner. Think Götterdämmerung. It’s hard to know where to start with this one. Let me give you a setting: the “now” is the … Continue reading

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George Alec Effinger’s Audran Trilogy: When Gravity Fails, A Fire in the Sun, The Exile Kiss

Just to get it said, and because I think it has larger implications in discussing these works by George Alec Effinger (although maybe not, but it needs to be said anyway): I seldom comment on the design of books, mostly … Continue reading

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Gene Wolfe’s The Book of the New Sun

Science fiction, like any other genre, has its landmarks, those works that stand above their cohort and may, all else being equal, stand above most works from other genres as well (and I include so-called “mainstream” literature among genres). Gene … Continue reading

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Robert Silverberg’s To Be Continued: The Collected Stories of Robert Silverberg, Volume One

I’ve mentioned elsewhere that Robert Silverberg was one of those writers of the 1950s and 1960s who was regularly turning out interesting and workmanlike stories. Then came a series of novels that rocked readers of science fiction back on their … Continue reading

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Robert Silverberg’s Star of Gypsies

Speculative fiction, by which I mean that category that includes both fantasy and science fiction and their hybrids, has accumulated over the years a group of larger-than-life characters: Ralph 124C41+, the cat girl C’Mell, Jubal Harshaw, R. Daneel Olivaw, the … Continue reading

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Elizabeth Bear’s Hammered, Scardown, and Worldwired

It’s rather odd, from my point of view, to be sitting here after an intensive course in the works of Elizabeth Bear and finally have a chance to consider her first published novels, Hammered, Scardown, and Worldwired. These were greeted … Continue reading

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Samuel R. Delany’s Dhalgren

Samuel R. Delaney’s Dhalgren was originally published in 1974. It was brash, it was overtly experimental, it was greeted with everything from wild hallelujahs to roars of outrage. It was in many ways the culmination of science fiction’s New Wave: … Continue reading

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Robert Venditti and Brett Weldele’s The Surrogates: Flesh and Bone

Flesh and Bone is a prequel to The Surrogates, taking the story back fifteen years to the anti-surrogate riots of 2039. The incident that sparks the crisis is the beating death of a derelict by three teenagers who are using … Continue reading

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Reger Zelazny and Steve Grant’s Isle of The Dead audiobook

If you started listening to audiobooks over the past ten or so years, consider yourself to be extremely lucky, as you’re living in a true Golden Age where narration, production, and ease of use are extremely good. But long ago, … Continue reading

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Edgar Pangborn’s A Mirror for Observers

About 30,000 years ago, the Martians fled their dying planet for Earth, where they took up a hidden residence, waiting for humanity to progess to the point where it could accept them. They send their Observers out into the world, … Continue reading

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Edgar Pangborn’s Davy

Edgar Pangborn is one of those early science fiction writers who has been a very quiet legend for decades. Most happily, Old Earth Books some years back undertook to reissue his novels, for which all of us can be very … Continue reading

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Steven Brust and Skyler White’s The Skill of Our Hands

Call it “slipstream”: it’s not exactly science fiction, although it could be; nor is it fantasy, although it has elements of that, in the gritty, contemporary, urban vein; and anything it takes from mainstream fiction is more from the realm … Continue reading

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Connie Willis’ The Winds of Marble Arch and Other Stories and D.A.

What can I say about Connie Willis, except that she is one of the most consistently engaging writers I’ve ever run across? The Winds of Marble Arch and D.A. reinforce that opinion: they are, in a word, terrific. The Winds … Continue reading

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Connie Willis’ Blackout

Connie Willis has written some brilliant satires. She has a real gift for taking the routines and the personalities we encounter in daily life and, with just a tweak here and there, holding them up to sometimes merciless and often … Continue reading

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Edward James and Farah Mendelsohn’s The Cambridge Companion to Science Fiction

You know that science fiction has arrived at some sort of respectability when you are confronted by something like The Cambridge Companion to Science Fiction. This is not really a new phenomenon — science fiction has been the subject of … Continue reading

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James Gunn and Matthew Candelaria’s Speculations on Speculation: Theories of Science Fiction

There are at least two obvious responses to the statement that Speculations on Speculation, a group of essays on science fiction criticism, is one of the two or three most exciting books, fiction or nonfiction, that I have read recently: … Continue reading

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Glen Cook’s Winter’s Dreams

Glen Cook is known for his series — Dread Empire, Black Company, Garrett, P.I., Starfishers, and the like. What we tend to forget is that he has also written short fiction, which is fully up to the standard set in … Continue reading

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Elizabeth Bear’s All the Windwracked Stars

Take an event that we know from mythology, although it might have really happened. Let’s call it Ragnarok, just to give ourselves a point of reference, the final war when the Children of Light fought their brothers and sisters, the … Continue reading

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Jane S. Fancher’s ‘NetWalkers (Groundties, UpLink, Harmonies of the Net)

My history with Jane Fancher’s ‘NetWalkers trilogy begins a few years ago when, in one of those fits of madness that sometimes overcome me in bookstores, I picked up a copy of Groundties, a book by a totally unknown author … Continue reading

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Kage Baker’s Dark Mondays

Most people know Kage Baker from her novels and stories of the Company, those wonderful folks who discovered time travel and put it to their own uses. Sadly to say, I only recently encountered the Company. Then her newest story … Continue reading

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Jon Courtney Grimwood’s Lucifer’s Dragon

Lucifer’s Dragon is, as the Max Headroom series used to say, is set twenty minutes in the future. It set a century from now with flashbacks to a future not that far from our present. Though marketed as cyberpunk, it’s … Continue reading

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Robert Heinlein’s ‘All You Zombies—‘

In a scant fourteen minutes, Heinlein creates the perfect time travel story of all time and laid the foundation for World as Myth novels that were written much later than this which was written in Heinlein in 1958. He has … Continue reading

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Jack Vance and Humayoun Ibrahim’s The Moon Moth

At risk of dating myself, I remember Jack Vance’s “The Moon Moth” from its first publication in Galaxy magazine. (I admit it — I was a science fiction geek, with subscriptions to Galaxy, Analog, and The Magazine of Fantasy and … Continue reading

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Jeff Lemire, Matt Kindt, and Alberto Ponticelli’s Frankenstein, Agent of S.H.A.D.E.: Volume 1: War of The Monsters / Volume 2: Secrets of The Dead

When DC created the first wave of what they called the “The New 52!”, they mined the more obscure corners of their character archives to find properties interesting enough to be worthy of their own title. Now I’ll admit that … Continue reading

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Babylon 5’s ‘Day of the Dead’

Asher Black penned this review. I liked Babylon 5 the best in the first season. Sinclair was my favorite captain, the Russian commander Ivanova was still a strong character — and so at her hottest — and the Minbari, though the most … Continue reading

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