Tag Archives: mystery

Mike Resnick’s Stalking the Unicorn and Stalking the Vampire

Mike Resnick is one of those protean writers who should be much better known than he is. I remember Santiago as one of the most quietly spectacular works of science fiction I’ve ever read: a Quest, an Odyssey, beautifully conceived … Continue reading

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Barry Hughart’s Bridge of Birds

Bridge of Birds is an old favorite that has been sitting in a corner gathering dust for way too long. I recently hauled it out, dusted it off, and gave it another read, and it’s still as good as it … Continue reading

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Rita Mae Brown’s Crazy Like A Fox audiobook

If you’ve been following Green Man Review for any length of time, you’ll be aware I had a traumatic brain injury that affected my short term memory; that in turn rendered reading novels impossible, as I can’t follow the narrative worth … Continue reading

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Studio CLAMP’s Legal Drug, Vols. 1-3

Legal Drug is a series by CLAMP, with story by Ageha Ohkawa, illustrated by Tsubaki Nekoi, that, sadly to my mind, was dropped in 2003 when the magazine in which it was being serialized ceased publication. The first three volumes, … Continue reading

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George Alec Effinger’s Audran Trilogy: When Gravity Fails, A Fire in the Sun, The Exile Kiss

Just to get it said, and because I think it has larger implications in discussing these works by George Alec Effinger (although maybe not, but it needs to be said anyway): I seldom comment on the design of books, mostly … Continue reading

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Lawrence Schimel’s Fairy Tales for Writers/Charles Ardai’s The Good-Neighbor Policy: A Double-Cross in Double Dactyls

We are very fond of small presses here at Green Man Review, not least because they publish some of the most interesting things out there. Several years ago, A Midsummer Night’s Press was revived after a fairly lengthy hiatus. The … Continue reading

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Gosford Park

It was a hot humid day, and the prospect for a cool evening by the waterfront watching fireworks seemed too unlikely to consider. Traditionally we spent this holiday evening with our friends Fran and Kevin. Since the kids were infants … Continue reading

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Sharyn McCrumb’s The Songcatcher 

The Songcatcher is the latest volume in Sharyn McCrumb’s Ballad series, which examines life in the Appalachian Highlands as reflected in the folk music tradition of that culture. Earlier books in the series are If Ever I Return, Pretty Peggy-O … Continue reading

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Rebecca Ore’s Slow Funeral

Slow Funeral did not get lost in my reviewing pile — a pile now just small enough that our two felines aren’t in mortal danger from getting caught in a catquake that might bring down the pile! (Don’t laugh: this pile was … Continue reading

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Deborah Grabien’s JP Kinkaid Chronicles

I have been hooked on Deb Grabien’s novels since I had the great good fortune to read the first of her Haunted Ballads series. What pulled me in from the beginning was not only the characters and settings but also … Continue reading

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Phillip DePoy’s The Devil’s Hearth

I’ve a special fondness for mystery series set in the Appalachian Mountains as there’s not lot of good ones even though there’s a lot of not so great ones. Sharyn McCrumb’s Ballads series had some memorable outings, particularly among the … Continue reading

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Warren Ellis’ Ignition City, Vol. 1

I promised myself, when I read Warren Ellis’ Planetary, that I was going to become more familiar with his work. Well, up popped the first volume of the collected Ignition City, and it’s just as good. Mary Raven, like all … Continue reading

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Steven Brust’s Dzur

Dzur is the tenth in the Taltos Cycle. Brust said at one point that there was the distinct possibility of seventeen volumes in this series, unless he died or got bored with it, but I have a feeling that boredom … Continue reading

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Sharyn McCrumb’s Highland Laddie Gone

Have you ever been to a bonnie Highland Games in the States? One of me bands, Dead Heroes of Culloden, played a few well-payin’ gigs at some a ways back. Several of our lads being of Scottish heritage were both … Continue reading

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Anne Hillerman’s Spider Women’s Daughter

Anne Hillerman is, to quote her bio in this novel, ‘an award-winning reporter, the author of several nonfiction books, and the daughter of New York Times bestselling mystery author Tony Hillerman. She lives in Santa Fe. This is her first … Continue reading

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Rita Mae Brown’s Let Sleeping Dogs Lie

This long running mystery series, this is the ninth novel so far, is always an interesting read for me. This series  grows out of her passions for horses, hounds, and American fox hunting which show up frequently in her fiction … Continue reading

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Craig Johnson’s Dry Bones

Ok, let’s start off by noting that the characters here are not the same in their characterisation as the one submarine their names on the excellent Longmire series currently running on Netflix after its previous network canceled. Even the depiction … Continue reading

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Sharyn McCrumb’s Ghost Riders

Ghost Riders is the latest novel in Sharyn McCrumb’s “Ballad Series.” Ghost Riders is different from the others in the series in that there is no mystery (in the “mystery novel” sense of the word) to be solved. In the … Continue reading

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Jon Courtenay Grimwood’s Arabesk trilogy 

El Iskandriya sits at the Delta as she has done for thousands of years, a city of great wealth, staggering poverty, intrigue, indolence, and, because she is technically a free city open to the currents of influence from the lands … Continue reading

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Jon Courtenay Grimwood’s 9Tail Fox

The book cover claims that Jon Courtenay Grimwood’s 9Tail Fox is “A novel of science fiction.” Considering what science fiction has become over the past generation, that could well be valid — with some qualifications. I’m going to call it … Continue reading

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The Medieval Murderers’ Sword of Shame

The Medieval Murderers (authors actually: Michael Jecks, Susanna Gregory, Bernard Knight, Ian Morson and Phillip Gooden), after pooling their talents on The Tainted Relic, have done so again with The Sword of Shame. As in Relic, each author contributes their own murder mystery, … Continue reading

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Jasper Fforde’s The Eyre Affair

Enter a world where things are very, very different.  Where in 1985, Britain is a virtual police state, engaged in border wars with the People’s Republic of Wales, and well into the 131st year of the Crimean War.  Where all … Continue reading

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Norberto Barba, et al.: Grimm, Seasons One and Two

The NBC Television series Grimm entered my life quite by chance, when our esteemed publisher e-mailed me asking whether I wanted to review it. Knowing absolutely nothing about it, but having a newly acquired TV and DVD player, of course … Continue reading

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Alex Bledsoe’s Dark Jenny

What do you get when you mix the legend of King Arthur with the detective fiction of Raymond Chandler? It seems you come up with Alex Bledsoe’s stories of Eddie LaCrosse, sometime mercenary soldier, sometime hardboiled detective. In Dark Jenny, … Continue reading

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Carole Nelson Douglas’s Cat in a Kiwi Con 

No’am Newman wrote this for us. First, the facts: this is the fourteenth in a series of mystery books written about a cat called Midnight Louie. Some of the others have alliterative names such as Cat in a Diamond Dazzle or Cat in … Continue reading

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Phillip DePoy’s The Devil’s Hearth

I’ve a special fondness for mystery series set in the Appalachian Mountains, even though there aren’t a lot of good ones and a lot of not so great ones. Sharyn McCrumb’s Ballads series had some memorable outings, particularly among the … Continue reading

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Dusty Rainbolt’s Death Under The Crescent Moon

There’s a moment toward the end of Dusty Rainbolt’s Death Under the Crescent Moon that is worth the price of admission all by its lonesome. In that instant, Rainbolt takes the clichés of the haunted hotel mystery and neatly dumps … Continue reading

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