Tag Archives: jazz

Keith Jarrett’s Radiance

Keith Jarrett is a remarkable example of the phenomenon of the performer/composer. Although he is generally considered a jazz pianist — one of the finest — I first became acquainted with his work through his recordings of the twentieth century … Continue reading

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Boban Marković Orkestar’s Boban i Marko

There seems to be, in the Gypsy tradition of Serbian music, an affinity for Western jazz. This does not mean that the music performed by the Boban Marković Orkestar is jazz, but simply that jazz wanders in and feels very … Continue reading

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Christian Jormin 3’s Sol Salutis

The Christian Jormin 3 is a jazz trio based in Sweden, comprised of Christian Jormin, piano and percussion; Mattias Gröroos, bass; and Magnus Boqvist, drums. Sol Salutis is, indeed, jazz, and sometimes subject to that cold intellectualism that I often … Continue reading

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Vieux Farka Touré

There were, in the middle of the last century, over 1,000 languages spoken in Africa, grouped into four large families, not counting creoles and pidgins (estimates have actually ranged as high as 3,000 altogether). This does actually have something to … Continue reading

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Kristian Blak’s Ravnating/Concerto Grotto og Drangar/Klæmint

To be perfectly honest, I hadn’t expected to like the music of Kristian Blak. It does fall, to a large extent, under the rubric “new age,” although much more in the progressive jazz camp than my most favored artists from … Continue reading

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Red Clay Ramblers’ It Ain’t Right

The Red Clay Ramblers have been playing what’s now known as “new old-time” music since the early 1970s, and it’s entirely possible that they invented the genre, or at least played a part in its birth. They’ve put out more … Continue reading

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Allen Lowe’s American Pop from Minstrel to Mojo: On Record 1893 to 1957

Brendan Foreman penned this review. Reading Allen Lowe’s book American Pop from Minstrel to Mojo: On Record 1893 to 1957, I found myself agreeing with the late Tupac Shakur’s vision of the afterlife. Heaven would simply be a large night club filled … Continue reading

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Stephane Grappelli’s A Life in the Jazz Century

Stephane Grappelli was one of the most influential musicians of the 20th Century, and one of the most loved. This sterling film project shows why. Grappelli was born in 1908 in the village of Montmartre, now a section of Paris. … Continue reading

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Kenny Wheeler’s Songs for Quintet

This quintet album represents the last ensemble sessions the American expat flugelhornist Kenny Wheeler played, and it’s a quietly powerful date. I was unfamiliar with Wheeler before hearing this elegiac ECM release, and it’s my loss. I hope to go … Continue reading

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Hubert Laws’ In The Beginning

Hubert Laws’ In The Beginning is one of my favorite albums of all time, and has been since I first bought the double-LP set in 1976. I feel honored and a little intimidated to have the privilege of reviewing the … Continue reading

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