Tag Archives: horror

Jim Butcher’s Summer Knight

The White Council of Wizards is meeting in Chicago to discuss the war with the Red Court Vampires (and by extension, all the vampires). Chicago is the home of Harry Dresden, a wizard for hire who combines his wizardry with … Continue reading

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Jim Butcher’s Welcome to the Jungle

Jim Butcher has moved the Dresden Files into the realm of graphic novels with Welcome to the Jungle, a prequel of sorts to his series on the adventures of Harry Dresden, Chicago’s only wizard for hire. It looks open and … Continue reading

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Neil Gaiman’s The Graveyard Book

In many ways, Bod Owens is a typical little boy. He’s very inquisitive. He doesn’t like yucky food. And he wants to explore the world. In one key way, though, Bod’s a wee bit different from other kids: he’s been … Continue reading

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Toby Barlow’s Sharp Teeth

I’ve had one previous experience with fantasy in verse (well, unless one counts the Iliad, the Odyssey, and the like), and it wasn’t a happy one. Nevertheless, when Toby Barlow’s Sharp Teeth crossed my desk, I screwed my courage to … Continue reading

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Christophe Gans’ Brotherhood of the Wolf (Le Pacte des Loups)

I hardly know where to start with Christophe Gans’ Brotherhood of the Wolf (Le Pacte des Loups) – it’s sort of outside my normal range of subject matter, but the DVD case looked interesting enough, and the price was right, … Continue reading

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Susan Kim and Laurence Klavan’s Brain Camp

I think the best description I’ve seen of Brain Camp, written by Susan Kim and Laurence Klavan, drawn by Faith Erin Hicks, is “creepy.” Camp Fielding is a parent’s dream: a summer camp dedicated to taking your young loser and … Continue reading

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Simon Oliver’s Hellblazer, Vol. 1: The Poison Truth

John Constantine is back in London, after suffering exile in New York — the result of a curse by a demon that caused remaining in London to infect Constantine with a possibly fatal disease. But, as usual, Constantine has found … Continue reading

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Sid Jacobson and Ernie Colón’s Vlad the Impaler: The Man Who Was Dracula

The historical Vlad III, the Impaler, whose story this book purports to tell, was a voivode — “prince” — of Wallachia in the later fifteenth century. He is known mainly for his policy of independence from the Ottoman Empire, of … Continue reading

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Peter Milligan’s John Constantine: Hellblazer India

I’ve read the entire three hundred issue run of Hellblazer in trade editions save some in the middle of the run that Vertigo, a unit of DC Comics, from reasons not terribly clear to anyone was not released in that … Continue reading

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Mike Mignola and John Bryne’s Hellboy: The Library Edition, Volume One

The volumes in this format, six as I write this look at the first one, look larger than they actually as they’re nine inches by twelve inches. The covers are black matte finish with gold lettering on them. Rather classy … Continue reading

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Christopher Golden’s The Secret Backs of Things

Carpet sharks. The Wild Hunt. Human skin framed as a canvas in a painting. Really old Scottish manors with very odd monsters. The Norns. Hellboy. And that’s but a sampling of the things that are to be found in this … Continue reading

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Patricia Anthony’s Flanders

Jayme Lynn Blaschke penned this review. There are few things more depressing in life than to see brilliance punished. The fact that it happens with disturbing regularity makes it no less palatable, and when it happens to a writer as overwhelmingly … Continue reading

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Nina Kiriki Hoffman’s The Thread That Binds The Bones and The Silent Strength of Stones

In The Thread That Binds The Bones, Nina Kiriki Hoffman introduces Tom Renfield, an odd young man who can see ghosts and who discovers in a time of crisis that he can even perform feats of magic. He flees the notoriety … Continue reading

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Ray Fawkes’ Gotham By Midnight

As you might have noticed in my review of the DC Showcase’s The Spectre animated short film, I find this DC character fascinating. So I was fascinating when I heard that DC had announced that this Gotham City based supernatural … Continue reading

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Nina Kiriki Hoffman’s Spirits That Walk In Shadow

It’s late autumn here in New England. The last lingering tattered leaves have crashed and burned to the ground, and even the fiery rites of Halloween and Guy Fawkes are behind us. We’re left with a shrinking hoard of days … Continue reading

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Tim Lebbon & Christopher Golden’s Mind the Gap

Hidden, magical London is all the rage these days. First there was Neil Gaiman’s Neverwhere, then China Mieville’s Un Lun Dun. And now there’s Mind the Gap, a collaborative effort between American novelist and comics writer Christopher Golden and British horror novelist Tim … Continue reading

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Tim Lebbon & Christopher Golden’s The Map of Moments

Readers who come to The Map of Moments looking for something similar to Mind the Gap are in for a rude shock. Where the first novel of the Hidden Cities was essentially YA, The Map of Moments is steeped in sex and death, a whirlwind … Continue reading

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The Wicker Man

When Sergeant Howie of the Scottish West Highlands Constabulary receives an anonymous letter reporting the disappearance of a young girl, he travels to a remote Scottish island to investigate the charge. To his horror, the righteous and devoutly Christian Howie … Continue reading

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Charles Stross’ The Rhesus Chart

Warning: here be spoilers. Lots of them. There are no such things as vampires. Everyone knows that, including Bob Howard and the other members of The Laundry, the secret agency that protects the British from the eldritch horrors that are … Continue reading

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Clive Barker’s Tortured Souls: The Legend of Primordium

Originally written as a multi-part story to go with a series of Todd MacFarlane action figures, Tortured Souls: The Legend of Primordium is perhaps the most perfectly old-school Clive Barker piece ever written. Which is to say that within its … Continue reading

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Ellen Datlow and Nick Mamatas’ Haunted Legends

It’s something of a paradox:  As a collection I found this volume kind of weak, but there are a lot of very fine stories in it.  So many, in fact, that on going back over the anthology a second time, … Continue reading

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Ray Bradbury’s Something Wicked This Way Comes

By right and nature, all October babies should love Something Wicked This Way Comes. It is a love letter to autumn, and to the Halloween season in particular, a gorgeous take on maturity and self-acceptance and all the dark temptations … Continue reading

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