Tag Archives: fantasy

Jane Frank’s Science Fiction and Fantasy Artists of the Twentieth Century: A Biographical Dictionary

Jane Frank’s Science Fiction and Fantasy Artists of the Twentieth Century is a successor volume to Robert Weinberg’s Biographical Dictionary of Science Fiction and Fantasy Artists, published in 1988. Given the labor-intensive quality of a project such as this one, … Continue reading

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Patricia A. McKillip’s In the Forests of Serre

Patricia A. McKillip does something in In the Forests of Serre that I don’t think I’ve ever noticed her doing before: there are recognizable elements of traditional folklore in the story. In fact, they are critically important parts of the … Continue reading

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Elizabeth Bear’s Blood and Iron

One of the freshest and most interesting developments in fantasy literature over the past decade or two has been the emergence of what I tend to call “contemporary fantasy.” Known also as “urban fantasy” or sometimes “mythic literature,” it combines … Continue reading

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Camille Bacon-Smith’s Daemon Eyes

Deamon Eyes is an omnibus edition of Camille Bacon-Smith’s two novels of the half-demon Evan Davis; his father, known to mortals as Kevin Bradley; and Lily Ryan, another demon. The three set themselves up as detectives, doing business as Bradley, … Continue reading

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Mike Resnick’s Stalking the Unicorn: A Fable of Tonight

MISSING: One unicorn. Answers to the name of “Larkspur.” Distinguishing marks: Perfect ruby embedded in forehead. Last seen in the company of Mürgenstürm, elf, whose job was to guard said creature. Priceless. Hefty reward. THE SUSPECTS: Mürgenstürm: His story doesn’t … Continue reading

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Mike Resnick’s The Other Teddy Roosevelts

This review was written by Faith J. Cormier. Alternative History — the literary artifice of postulating that some historical event either never occurred or had a different outcome than it did in real life and deducing how society would have … Continue reading

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Mike Resnick’s Dragon America

I’d bet that early colonists were surprised, even frightened, by some of the strange new creatures America had to offer. But I’m sure nothing surprised them more than seeing dragons soaring overhead. Wait, you never heard about the dragons? Looks … Continue reading

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Mike Resnick’s The Doctor and the Rough Rider

Mike Resnick, as I’m sure I’ve stated before somewhere – probably here – is one of those writers who should not need an introduction. He’s one of most prolific – and versatile — writers in science fiction, and one of … Continue reading

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Mike Resnick’s The Doctor and the Dinosaurs

The Doctor and the Dinosaurs is the latest in Mike Resnick’s Weird West Tales, featuring Doc Holliday, Tom Edison, Ned Buntline, and, back for an encore, Teddy Roosevelt. And once again, Goyathlay, known to the white man as Geronimo, is … Continue reading

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Mike Resnick’s The Buntline Special: A Weird West Tale

Whee, that was a fun read! Ever hear the story of the gunfight at OK Corral? I’m sure you have, as it’s well-known aspect of American culture, to the point that there as even a Star Trek — The Original … Continue reading

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Various Authors’ Doctor Who:The Target Storybook

A Doctor Who anthology typically involves multiple incarnations of the doctor, and multiple authors telling stories. In the case of The Target Storybook the reader is given a collection of 15 stories, each relating to one Doctor or another era, usually … Continue reading

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Chaz Brenchley’s The Devil in the Dust

Despite what the church claimed and the people believed, this was still a Kingdom born of younger sons, the land-hungry and the dispossessed. Thus begins one of the more fascinating books I’ve read in a while, Chaz Brenchley’s The Devil … Continue reading

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Troy Carrol Bucher‘s Lies of Descent

So sometimes, you just cannot connect with a book. Lies of Descent is the first book in a new trilogy by Troy Carrol Bucher. It is also a volume that fails in many ways to connect with the reader. The … Continue reading

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Julie E. Czerneda‘s The Gossamer Mage

The stand-alone fantasy novel is something of a rarity in this day and age, and Julie E. Czerneda as produced an excellent example of it. Czerneda is already an experienced hand in the fantasy genre, with 20 novels under her … Continue reading

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ZBZ Media: Four Picks

ZBS Media has been around since the 1970s, but I became aware of them in the 80s, when my spiritual advisor, Mindy the Pagan Hairdresser, lent me cassettes of The Fourth Tower of Inverness and Moon Over Morocco.  This year, … Continue reading

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Richard Kadrey’s The Grand Dark

In the past I’ve enjoyed Richard Kadrey’s Sandman Slim series for its supernatural noir flavor, featuring engaging characters, taut plotting, touches of arcane lore, and an underlying cosmology that shows in glints beneath the thriller stories, like a knifeblade’s flash … Continue reading

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Mike Resnick’s The Doctor and the Kid

Subtitled “A Weird West Tale,” Mike Resnick’s The Doctor and the Kid is an installment in his stories of the Weird West — an alternate universe in which the westward expansion of the United States has been halted at the … Continue reading

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Steven Brust’s Jhereg

Jhereg is the first book in Steven Brust’s Taltos Cycle, the story of Vlad Taltos, human, as opposed to Dragaeran (also “Easterner”, the East being inhabited by humans), crime boss, assassin. Note: That’s first in order publication, not first chronologically … Continue reading

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Gregory Frost’s Fitcher’s Brides

This review was written by Deborah J. Brannon for an earlier version of GMR. Fitcher’s Brides, by Gregory Frost, is one of the most recent additions to Terri Windling’s excellent brainchild, The Fairy Tale Series. As such, it shares shelf … Continue reading

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James Mangold’s The Wolverine

It should come as no surprise that I saw The Wolverine when it came out. I was impressed enough that I bought the DVD when that came out. (Another coupon – I try to avoid paying full price for anything.) … Continue reading

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Neil Gaiman’s M Is for Magic

This review was written by Deborah J. Brannon for an earlier site. There is a child who burns with curiosity, who is full of the Wood. He knows there are scary things in the world, and amazing things too. This … Continue reading

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Douglas Clegg’s Isis: A Tale of the Supernatural

This review was written by Faith J. Cormier for a previous incarnation of GMR. Have you ever read “The Monkey’s Paw” by W. W. Jacobs? It’s a nasty little story that proves quite graphically that bringing the dead back to … Continue reading

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Lisa Yaszek’s The Future Is Female!

The Future is Female! represents The Library of America’s continued efforts to provide authoritative volumes on any given subject. This is a large collection, featuring twenty five stories that show a wide rang of fiction. In addition, there are notations … Continue reading

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Tite Kubo and Noriuke Abe’s Bleach Movie 2: The Diamond Dust Rebellion

The Diamond Dust Rebellion is the second animated feature based on Tite Kubo’s very popular manga series, Bleach. It won’t leave you as completely at sea as did Memories of Nobody if you’re not familiar with the series, but the … Continue reading

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Christopher Moore, Ian Corson, and Jennyson Rosero’s The Griff

The Griff, scripted by Christopher Moore and Ian Corson, and drawn by Jennyson Rosero, is a story of the Apocalypse, told while said Apocalypse is happening. It was developed, we are told, from the script for a film — Corson … Continue reading

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Brian K. Vaughan and Fiona Staples’ Saga, Volume 1

The very helpful and knowledgeable young man at my local comics store directed me to Brian K. Vaughan’s Saga, which is one of the more bizarre examples of graphic lit I’ve run across recently. Marko and Alana are — or … Continue reading

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Ellen Kushner and Delia Sherman’s The Fall of the Kings

Ellen Kushner’s first novel was Swordspoint, a romantic fantasy set in a universe strongly reminiscent of Jacobean and Restoration London, with admixtures of the Elizabethan and Georgian eras – life is bigger than life, intrigue is rampant, the City, which … Continue reading

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Tanya Huff’s The Second Summoning

Tanya Huff’s The Second Summoning is, as might be expected, a sequel to Summon the Keeper. It is just as wryly funny, with the attitude we’ve come to expect from Huff, and is sometimes surprisingly insightful about the trials and … Continue reading

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Peter S. Beagle and Jacob Weisman‘s The Unicorn Anthology

An anthology is always an interesting read, filled with multiple narratives and styles and as a result uneven by nature. The Unicorn Anthology, edited by Peter S. Beagle and Jacob Weisman, is one which comes with a plainly stated theme. … Continue reading

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Charles de Lint

James Hetley is a friend of de Lint’s that has written a number of of fantasy novels including The Summer Country. You can visit him here. Cat Eldridge has done a dangerous thing, asking me to talk about Charles de … Continue reading

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Necessary Stories

Terri Windling is the author of The Wood Wife and also the Oak Wood Chronicles which are illustrated by Wendy Froud. You can visit her here. Some years ago I had a conversation with a man who thought that writing … Continue reading

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Charles de Lint’s Svaha

Svaha is Charles de Lint’s science-fiction novel. It seems that every fantasy writer must write at least one science-fiction novel, just as every science fiction writer must experiment with fantasy of one sort or another. As a dystopian, post-Apocalypse science … Continue reading

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On Charles de Lint: Some Writers Speak

We decided to ask some of the writers and artists who hang out in the Green Man Pub to say a few words about Charles de Lint and his endeavours. Here’s what they said… Holly Black: Charles de Lint could … Continue reading

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Charles de Lint: An Appreciation

This commentary is from OR Melling who’s very much at home thisaway. It’s difficult to review Charles de Lint without getting personal and panegyrical for, as is the case with most if not all of his readers, I feel as … Continue reading

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Tanya Huff’s Summon the Keeper

Summon the Keeper is quite possibly the first of Tanya Huff’s books that I read – she’s another one of those writers who has a long history in my library. This one is a contemporary urban fantasy that is hilariously … Continue reading

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Glen Cook’s Port of Shadows

Glen Cook’s Port of Shadows is another installment in the saga of the Black Company, once again narrated by Croaker. Cook has given us two story lines in this one: The first takes place in the distant past, in the … Continue reading

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Charles de Lint’s Somewhere in My Mind There Is A Painting Box

One of the great joys of the digital publishing age is that it allows authors like Charles de Lint to offer up their back list of short stories and novels to us on their own terms. Some of these stories … Continue reading

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Mike Resnick’s Stalking the Unicorn and Stalking the Vampire

Mike Resnick is one of those protean writers who should be much better known than he is. I remember Santiago as one of the most quietly spectacular works of science fiction I’ve ever read: a Quest, an Odyssey, beautifully conceived … Continue reading

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Barry Hughart’s Bridge of Birds

Bridge of Birds is an old favorite that has been sitting in a corner gathering dust for way too long. I recently hauled it out, dusted it off, and gave it another read, and it’s still as good as it … Continue reading

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George R. R. Martin’s A Game of Thrones, A Clash of Kings, A Storm of Swords

Since the creation of the first three novels of George R. R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire series, inevitable comparisons have been made, a great deal between him and another revered author and pioneer of the fantasy epic: … Continue reading

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Emma Bull’s Territory: A Unique Retelling of An American Legend

The gunfight at the O.K. Corral is one of those seminal historical events that every American knows about — or at least thinks they know. In the materials accompanying the ARC for Territory Emma Bull comments that there are many … Continue reading

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Jim Butcher’s Summer Knight

The White Council of Wizards is meeting in Chicago to discuss the war with the Red Court Vampires (and by extension, all the vampires). Chicago is the home of Harry Dresden, a wizard for hire who combines his wizardry with … Continue reading

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Jim Butcher’s Welcome to the Jungle

Jim Butcher has moved the Dresden Files into the realm of graphic novels with Welcome to the Jungle, a prequel of sorts to his series on the adventures of Harry Dresden, Chicago’s only wizard for hire. It looks open and … Continue reading

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Neil Gaiman’s The Graveyard Book

In many ways, Bod Owens is a typical little boy. He’s very inquisitive. He doesn’t like yucky food. And he wants to explore the world. In one key way, though, Bod’s a wee bit different from other kids: he’s been … Continue reading

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Kevin Hearne’s A Plague of Giants

The author of the best-selling urban fantasy series The Iron Druid Chronicles has begun a new series that promises to be, well, huge. Kevin Hearne’s new The Seven Kennings series begins with A Plague of Giants. It’s a hefty tome … Continue reading

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The Wild Reel: He comes for me when I sleep (excerpt)

Dream in a Field of Wildflowers He comes for me when I sleep. Resplendent atop a huge, ebony-skinned charger, its mane and tail rippling with white fire, he rides surrounded by the squalls of the seasons. I feel the gentle … Continue reading

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Sean Russell’s The Initiate Brother/Gatherer of Clouds

I have a reread list of books that have impressed me one way or another over the years. One that I only recently took up again is Sean Russell’s duology, The Initiate Brother and Gatherer of Clouds, which really is … Continue reading

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Toby Barlow’s Sharp Teeth

I’ve had one previous experience with fantasy in verse (well, unless one counts the Iliad, the Odyssey, and the like), and it wasn’t a happy one. Nevertheless, when Toby Barlow’s Sharp Teeth crossed my desk, I screwed my courage to … Continue reading

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Jane Lindskold’s Legends Walking

Jane Lindskold has followed up Changer with Legends Walking, which opens a few weeks after Changer closes. The same characters appear, many in expanded roles, new athanor characters participate, and the story takes on added complexity as several plot lines … Continue reading

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Jane Lindskold’s Changer

Urban fanstasy is a subgenre with as many sets of criteria as there are practitioners. Ranging from the Celto-Amerindian universe of Charles de Lint’s urban Canada and Neil Gaiman’s eclectic universe of the Dreaming, with even hybrids such as Mark … Continue reading

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