Tag Archives: fantasy

Charles de Lint

James Hetley is a friend of de Lint’s that has written a number of of fantasy novels including The Summer Country. You can visit him here. Cat Eldridge has done a dangerous thing, asking me to talk about Charles de … Continue reading

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Necessary Stories

Terri Windling is the author of The Wood Wife and also the Oak Wood Chronicles which are illustrated by Wendy Froud. You can visit her here. Some years ago I had a conversation with a man who thought that writing … Continue reading

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Charles de Lint’s Svaha

Svaha is Charles de Lint’s science-fiction novel. It seems that every fantasy writer must write at least one science-fiction novel, just as every science fiction writer must experiment with fantasy of one sort or another. As a dystopian, post-Apocalypse science … Continue reading

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On Charles de Lint: Some Writers Speak

We decided to ask some of the writers and artists who hang out in the Green Man Pub to say a few words about Charles de Lint and his endeavours. Here’s what they said… Holly Black: Charles de Lint could … Continue reading

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Charles de Lint: An Appreciation

This commentary is from OR Melling who’s very much at home thisaway. It’s difficult to review Charles de Lint without getting personal and panegyrical for, as is the case with most if not all of his readers, I feel as … Continue reading

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Tanya Huff’s Summon the Keeper

Summon the Keeper is quite possibly the first of Tanya Huff’s books that I read – she’s another one of those writers who has a long history in my library. This one is a contemporary urban fantasy that is hilariously … Continue reading

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Glen Cook’s Port of Shadows

Glen Cook’s Port of Shadows is another installment in the saga of the Black Company, once again narrated by Croaker. Cook has given us two story lines in this one: The first takes place in the distant past, in the … Continue reading

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Charles de Lint’s Somewhere in My Mind There Is A Painting Box

One of the great joys of the digital publishing age is that it allows authors like Charles de Lint to offer up their back list of short stories and novels to us on their own terms. Some of these stories … Continue reading

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Mike Resnick’s Stalking the Unicorn and Stalking the Vampire

Mike Resnick is one of those protean writers who should be much better known than he is. I remember Santiago as one of the most quietly spectacular works of science fiction I’ve ever read: a Quest, an Odyssey, beautifully conceived … Continue reading

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Barry Hughart’s Bridge of Birds

Bridge of Birds is an old favorite that has been sitting in a corner gathering dust for way too long. I recently hauled it out, dusted it off, and gave it another read, and it’s still as good as it … Continue reading

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George R. R. Martin’s A Game of Thrones, A Clash of Kings, A Storm of Swords

Since the creation of the first three novels of George R. R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire series, inevitable comparisons have been made, a great deal between him and another revered author and pioneer of the fantasy epic: … Continue reading

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Emma Bull’s Territory: A Unique Retelling of An American Legend

The gunfight at the O.K. Corral is one of those seminal historical events that every American knows about — or at least thinks they know. In the materials accompanying the ARC for Territory Emma Bull comments that there are many … Continue reading

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Jim Butcher’s Summer Knight

The White Council of Wizards is meeting in Chicago to discuss the war with the Red Court Vampires (and by extension, all the vampires). Chicago is the home of Harry Dresden, a wizard for hire who combines his wizardry with … Continue reading

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Jim Butcher’s Welcome to the Jungle

Jim Butcher has moved the Dresden Files into the realm of graphic novels with Welcome to the Jungle, a prequel of sorts to his series on the adventures of Harry Dresden, Chicago’s only wizard for hire. It looks open and … Continue reading

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Neil Gaiman’s The Graveyard Book

In many ways, Bod Owens is a typical little boy. He’s very inquisitive. He doesn’t like yucky food. And he wants to explore the world. In one key way, though, Bod’s a wee bit different from other kids: he’s been … Continue reading

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Kevin Hearne’s A Plague of Giants

The author of the best-selling urban fantasy series The Iron Druid Chronicles has begun a new series that promises to be, well, huge. Kevin Hearne’s new The Seven Kennings series begins with A Plague of Giants. It’s a hefty tome … Continue reading

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The Wild Reel: He comes for me when I sleep (excerpt)

Dream in a Field of Wildflowers He comes for me when I sleep. Resplendent atop a huge, ebony-skinned charger, its mane and tail rippling with white fire, he rides surrounded by the squalls of the seasons. I feel the gentle … Continue reading

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Sean Russell’s The Initiate Brother/Gatherer of Clouds

I have a reread list of books that have impressed me one way or another over the years. One that I only recently took up again is Sean Russell’s duology, The Initiate Brother and Gatherer of Clouds, which really is … Continue reading

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Toby Barlow’s Sharp Teeth

I’ve had one previous experience with fantasy in verse (well, unless one counts the Iliad, the Odyssey, and the like), and it wasn’t a happy one. Nevertheless, when Toby Barlow’s Sharp Teeth crossed my desk, I screwed my courage to … Continue reading

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Jane Lindskold’s Legends Walking

Jane Lindskold has followed up Changer with Legends Walking, which opens a few weeks after Changer closes. The same characters appear, many in expanded roles, new athanor characters participate, and the story takes on added complexity as several plot lines … Continue reading

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Jane Lindskold’s Changer

Urban fanstasy is a subgenre with as many sets of criteria as there are practitioners. Ranging from the Celto-Amerindian universe of Charles de Lint’s urban Canada and Neil Gaiman’s eclectic universe of the Dreaming, with even hybrids such as Mark … Continue reading

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Orson Scott Card’s Magic Street

In his previous novels, Orson Scott Card seems to have dealt with either the (far) future or the (mythic) past. Magic Street is set squarely in the here-and-now — sort of. Baldwin Hills is a black, middle-class neighborhood in Los … Continue reading

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Jane Lindskold’s Child of a Rainless Year

Jane Lindskold is one of the more adventurous authors working in the mode of speculative fiction. From her transparent contributions to Roger Zelazny’s last two books through the contemporary urban fantasy of the athanor novels through the more-or-less “classic” fantasy … Continue reading

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Patricia A. McKillip’s Solstice Wood

It seems somewhat odd, on reflection, to realize that in a genre that so often uses magic as a metaphor and/or device, so few writers actually evoke the qualities of magic in their writing. That observation is prompted by Patricia … Continue reading

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Charles de Lint’s The Wind In His Heart

The Wind in His Heart is Charles de Lint’s first adult novel in eight years. It was worth waiting for. Usually, one tries to start a review of a book by giving a sense of the set-up, the opening situation, … Continue reading

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Charles de Lint: Some thoughts on his fiction

I’m not sure which of Charles de Lint’s books I read first, or that it matters — probably not. What matters is that I’ve been reading his fiction for quite a while now, and with one or two exceptions, I’ve … Continue reading

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George R. R. Martin and Gardner Dozois’ Songs of the Dying Earth: Stories in Honor of Jack Vance

Anyone who doubts the pervasive and ongoing influence of Jack Vance need only look at the table of contents to this tribute volume. Many of the contributors are legends themselves (Glen Cook, Neil Gaiman, Tanith Lee, Robert Silverberg); others are … Continue reading

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Brian Froud’s The Secret Sketchbooks of Brian Froud

I suppose there might be someone, somewhere, who has never heard of Brian Froud. He was already gaining a reputation as an illustrator of books for children when his distinctive vision was brought to a wider audience through his designs … Continue reading

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Steven Erikson’s The Malazan Book of the Fallen, Vols. 1-5

Gardens of the Moon Deadhouse Gates Memories of Ice House of Chains Midnight Tides I’ve been listening to Richard Wagner’s Der Ring Des Nibelungen and I’ve been reading Midnight Tides, book five of Steven Erikson’s The Malazan Book of the … Continue reading

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Glen Cook’s Working God’s Mischief

Working God’s Mischief is the fourth installment in Glen Cook’s Instrumentalities of the Night. It’s hard to know how to lead into this one, so I’m going to let Cook do it: Arnhand, Castauriga, and Navaya lost their kings. The … Continue reading

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Jane Lindskold’s Nine Gates

Ever since their exile from the Lands Born from Smoke and Sacrifice a century ago, the Thirteen Orphans and their descendants have done their best to blend into the cultures of Earth, striving to maintain their bloodlines and protect their … Continue reading

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Jane Lindskold’s Five Odd Honors

Five Odd Honors continues the story begun in Thirteen Orphans and Nine Gates, leading the Orphans and their allies back to the Lands of Smoke and Sacrifice from which they were exiled years before. Five of the Orphans need to … Continue reading

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Jim Grimsley’s Kirith Kirin

Jim Grimsley is a successful playwright and novelist who has produced, in Kirith Kirin, a singular work of fantasy. The story revolves around Jessex, a boy of fourteen when the story opens, who narrates the tale of his entry into … Continue reading

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Neil Gaiman’s Neverwhere series

This review was written by Rebecca Scott for an earlier Green Man Review. Richard Mayhew, “normal, boring, a good laugh,” is a Scot living in London and working in securities. He’s got an apartment in a nearly fashionable street, a … Continue reading

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Jack Vance’s Tales of the Dying Earth

Jack Vance has been, throughout his long career as a science-fiction writer, one of the most consistently creative universe-builders in the field. From the far-flung stellar civilization of The Demon Princes to Alastor and The Dying Earth, his creations are … Continue reading

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Maria V. Snyder’s Poison Study; Michelle Sagara’s Cast In Shadow; Deborah Hale’s Destined Queen

Mary Sue (n.) : (1) A type of story where characterization, plot and theme is supplanted by the author’s quest for his or her own wish fulfillment. (2) any character that is a thinly disguised idealized version of the author … Continue reading

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Jack Vance’s The Kragen; Thomas M. Disch’s The Voyage of the Proteus: A Eyewitness Account of the End of the World; Cat Rambo and Jeff VanderMeer’s The Surgeon’s Tale and Other Stories

You may recall that we here at GMR are extraordinarily fond of the small presses that publish so many of the things we discuss. We are fond of them because they bring us all-but-forgotten classics, exciting new works from important … Continue reading

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Ursula K. LeGuin’s Gifts

The uplands of the Carrantages are a place of small holdings devoted to sheep herding, cattle, hunting, and farming, inhabited by families who all possess what they call “gifts.” The Barre gift is calling, mostly used to call game to … Continue reading

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Glen Cook’s The Many Deaths of the Black Company (Water Sleeps, Soldiers Live)

If you stop think about it, it’s rather remarkable that a living writer of speculative fiction finds himself with reissues of seemingly all of his earlier works hitting the market while he’s working on new ones. I think it says … Continue reading

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Glen Cook’s The Return of the Black Company (Bleak Seasons, She Is the Darkness)

The Return of the Black Company is the third installment of Tor’s reissue of The Annals of the Black Company, Glen Cook’s epic fantasy series. At this stage, the Black Company is at war with the Shadowlords, some of whom, … Continue reading

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Glen Cook’s The Books of the South (Shadow Games, Dreams of Steel, The Silver Spike)

Glen Cooks’ Annals of the Black Company ranks as one of the most significant (and most popular) fantasy series since Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings. While I won’t go so far as to agree with Steven Erikson that Cook “singlehandedly … Continue reading

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Glen Cook’s Chronicles of the Black Company (The Black Company, Shadows Linger, The White Rose)

We all have our personal lists, individual counterparts to those periodic lists of “most important,” “best,” or whatever the accolade of the moment might be. I have a personal list of “best fantasy series” that includes some works that might … Continue reading

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J.R.R. Tolkien’s the Lord of The Rings

Naomi de Bruyn penned this review for Folk Tales, the predecessor to GMR. It all began with an innocent tale for the kids, something to keep them amused and allow Tolkien to stretch his imagination and storytelling skills with the now … Continue reading

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Michael Cadnum’s Can’t Catch Me And Other Twice-Told Tales; Tim Powers’ A Soul in a Bottle

It seems that more and more, the books that cross my desk don’t fit into any sort of traditional category. I have to assume that’s deliberate, since there is a whole generation of young writers who are deliberately blurring the … Continue reading

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Jordan Mechner and A. B. Sina’s Prince of Persia

Prince of Persia presents us with another of the increasing number of spin-offs from gaming. It’s an intriguing story, sometimes filled with pathos, sometimes hair-raising, and always ambiguous. (And in case you were wondering, the plot of the graphic novel … Continue reading

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Steven Brust’s Vallista

Vallista is the fifteenth novel in the Taltos Cycle, recounting the adventures of Vlad Taltos, human (that is, “Easterner” to the Dragaerans), witch, and assassin. To set the stage, so to speak, the events in Vallista take place just before … Continue reading

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Anne Bishop’s Black Jewels Trilogy: Daughter of the Blood; Heir to the Shadows; Queen of the Darkness

“Night is not something to endure until dawn. It is an element, like wind or fire. Darkness is its own kingdom; it moves to its own laws, and many living things dwell in it.” — Patricia A. McKillip, from Harpist … Continue reading

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Elizabeth Hand’s Black Light

Elizabeth Hand’s Black Light is a foray into the world of dark gods, misty legends, and deep secrets. Lit Moylan (her real name is Charlotte) is about to finish high school. She lives with her parents in Kamensic, New York, … Continue reading

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Peter S. Beagle’s Return

As you’ve no doubt heard many times here at GMR, there is something unique about the writing of Peter S. Beagle. There’s a “can’t quite put your finger on it” quality that is, perhaps, equal parts simple, uninflected narration, universes … Continue reading

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Peter S. Beagle’s Giant Bones

Peter S. Beagle does not do sequels. He says. He is also one of the two fantasy writers I know who quite blithely admits that his universe-building is more than a little haphazard, just enough to hang the story on. … Continue reading

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