Tag Archives: early music

The Tallis Scholars Sing Josquin

Josquin des Pres (1450?-1521) was born Josquin Lebloitte, either in Hainault (modern Belgium) or in France. (The “des Pres” was a nickname, as they understood such things in the fifteenth century.) He seems to have been a choirboy at Saint-Quentin … Continue reading

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Ensemble Alcatraz’ Cantigas de Amigo

This review was written by Brendan Foreman for a previous incarnation of GMR. I’m beginning to suspect that eventually Dorian will have released a version of every single piece of Iberian medieval music still extant. This is by all means … Continue reading

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The Dufay Collective’s Music for Alfonso the Wise

Alfonso X, “el Sabio” (“the Wise”), was king of Castile and Leon from 1252 to 1284, a time when those realms were an outpost of European culture on a peninsula under the domination of the Muslim Moors. He was known … Continue reading

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The Ivory Consort’s Music from the Land of Three Faiths

(This review was written by Leonora Rose for a previous incarnation of the Green Man Review.) In 711 AD, Spain was conquered by the Muslims, who managed to make of it one of the few places in which the three … Continue reading

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The Tallis Scholars’ The Tallis Scholars Sing Josqin

Josqin des Pres (1450?-1521) was born Josqin Lebloitte, either in Hainault (modern Belgium) or in France. (The “des Pres” was a nickname, as they understood such things in the fifteenth century.) He seems to have been a choirboy at Saint-Quentin … Continue reading

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Frank Wallace’s Delphín

In “classical” music, recent decades have witnessed a string of revivals, from Wanda Landowska’s researches and stellar performances of music for the harpsichord and Vladimir Horowitz’s performances of Scarlatti through the burgeoning interest in plainsong and chant (including the disco … Continue reading

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Trio Mediaeval and Arve Henriksen’s Rímur

My first exposure to rímur came about when a recording by the Icelandic performer Steindór Andersen crossed my desk. Having wrapped my head around the forms and sounds in Andersen’s renderings of a traditional Icelandic form with strong foundations in … Continue reading

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Johann Sebastian Bach’s Goldberg Variations

There is a place in the history of musical performance where that history becomes legend. This is pertinent here because we are talking about one of those legends, Glenn Gould performing J. S. Bach’s Goldberg Variations. (There are other legendary … Continue reading

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Ensemble Melpomen’s Melpomen: Ancient Greek Music for an Athenian Symposium of ca. 450 BC

The essay that accompanies this disc is titled “Ancient Greek Music for an Athenian Symposium of around 450 BC.” Think about that for a moment: in the absence of scores, soundtracks, any notated music whatsoever, or any other specific records, … Continue reading

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Jon Balke and Amina Alaoui’s Siwan

People sometimes remark on my taste in music (as in “What on earth are you listening to now?”), and I’ll be the first to admit it’s rather broad. I figure it’s all just music, and half the fun of it … Continue reading

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Anders Hagberg and Johannes Landgren’s Of Air

Anders Hagberg and Johannes Landgren are both alumni of and teachers at the School of Music and Music Education of Göteborg University (Sweden). This recordingc is part of a series by the students and faculty of the School. The range … Continue reading

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Joseph Haydn’s Die Jahreszeiten (The Seasons)

I’m always delighted and amused by what the eighteenth century — one of the most mannered and formal periods in Western history — considered “lacking in artifice.” However, whatever my personal opinion (coming, as it does, from a casual and … Continue reading

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Antonio Vivaldi’s The Four Seasons; Arcangelo Corelli’s The Christmas Concerto

Antonio Vivaldi’s The Four Seasons, which, although actually four concerti grossi is invariably performed as a single work, was one of the most popular works in the baroque canon in the years after its creation in 1723, and after Vivaldi’s … Continue reading

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John Dowland’s Seven Teares: Music of John Dowland; The York Waites’ Fortune My Foe: Popular Music from the Period of the Gunpowder Plot

There was a time not so long ago (well, geologically speaking, at any rate) when court music and popular music were not so far apart. Say about four hundred years, give or take a decade. (This is really to some … Continue reading

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Anonymous 4’s The Origin of Fire: Music and Visions of Hildegard von Bingen

There is a large period between the fall of Rome and the late Middle Ages from which the names of artists, musicians and many other thinkers of note are lost to us. Thus it is of great interest when we … Continue reading

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Qntal’s Qntal III’s Tristan und Isolde

I long ago gave up apologizing for being a sloppy romantic. At my age, I figure I’m entitled. I also have a tendency, when the lists of CDs available come out from GMR, to get a little crazy and go … Continue reading

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Rolf Lislevand’s La Mascarade

Rolf Lislevand is a Norwegian performer of early music specializing in plucked string instruments — lute, vihuela, baroque guitar and theorbo. We’ve run into him before here, but I should take this opportunity to note that as well as being … Continue reading

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Rolf Lislevand’s Diminuito

Rolf Lislevand, in his essay accompanying Diminuito, says that this collection is about the Italian renaissance, “how it understood itself, how we understand it today, and how we would have understood it if we had been contemporary with it.” That’s … Continue reading

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Corvus Corax’ The Best of Corvus Corax

The German pop scene has got to be the one to watch. I’ve run across albums from Nubian drummers and medieval electro-pop duos who are big in the Berlin club scene, and now I’m listening to Corvus Corax, a group … Continue reading

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Les Witches’ Music of an Earlier Age

Les Witches is an early music ensemble who, according to their Web site, seek to “resurrect the ambience of the bars and taverns of Shakespeare’s time. . . .” They certainly seem to have done that, although when their focus … Continue reading

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Trio Mediaeval’s A Worcester Ladymass

I think one reason I’m so fond of Trio Mediaeval is that their attitude toward the performance of early music mirrors my own: in their introduction to this disc, they note that performing music from a thousand years ago (give … Continue reading

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