Tag Archives: comics

Mike Mignola and John Arcudi’s Abe Sapien: The Devil Does Not Jest and Other Stories

Among the many spin-offs from Mike Mignola’s Hellboy is the series Abe Sapien, relating the exploits of the eponymous hero, the amphibious man introduced as part of the B.P.R.D. This collection, The Devil Does Not Jest, is the second Abe … Continue reading

Posted in Graphic Literature | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Mike Mignola and John Arcudi’s Abe Sapien: The Devil Does Not Jest and Other Stories

Yeo Beop-Ryong and Park Hui-Jin’s Chronicles of the Cursed Sword 1-3

Yeo and Park’s first collection of Chronicles of the Cursed Sword contains the first three volumes of the original manhwa series. Like King of Hell, it’s a Korean action/adventure story with heavy supernatural overtones, this time involving not one but … Continue reading

Posted in Graphic Literature | Tagged , | Comments Off on Yeo Beop-Ryong and Park Hui-Jin’s Chronicles of the Cursed Sword 1-3

Ra In-Soo and Kim Jae-Hwan’s King of Hell,Vol.1-3

King of Hell is manhwa from Korea, a medium that, along with Chinese man hua, fits within the overall manga model. It’s what I’ve taken to calling a supernatural adventure, based on the exploits of one Majeh, an envoy for … Continue reading

Posted in Graphic Literature | Tagged , | Comments Off on Ra In-Soo and Kim Jae-Hwan’s King of Hell,Vol.1-3

Alan Moore and David Lloyd’s V for Vendetta

It was Dickens who said, “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times,” but by the time it rolled ’round to Alan Moore and David Lloyd, it was worse: nuclear holocaust, fascist dictatorships, concentration camps for … Continue reading

Posted in Graphic Literature | Tagged , | Comments Off on Alan Moore and David Lloyd’s V for Vendetta

Jay Oliva’s Justice League Dark

Once I got started on the Justice League Dark comic, I had to go back and check out the 2017 animated film. If anyone is expecting a film version of the new comic series, guess again: the film was released … Continue reading

Posted in Film | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Jay Oliva’s Justice League Dark

James Tynion IV’s Justice League Dark, #1-2

First, a disclaimer: I almost never read single-issue comics, for reasons that will become clear. Secondly, I haven’t been following DC’s Justice League Dark, a series first introduced in 2011. In fact, I have to confess to not being a … Continue reading

Posted in Graphic Literature | Tagged , , | Comments Off on James Tynion IV’s Justice League Dark, #1-2

Peter Straub and Michael Easton’s The Green Woman

The Green Woman, written by Peter Straub and Michael Easton, is a hallucination in full color — the latter thanks to John Bolton’s art. Reality gets severely warped here — if we can figure out whose reality we’re seeing. Fielding … Continue reading

Posted in Graphic Literature | Tagged , | Comments Off on Peter Straub and Michael Easton’s The Green Woman

Allan Heinberg’s Avengers: The Children’s Crusade

As our story opens, the Young Avengers are battling the Sons of the Serpent, a paramilitary group (read “militia”) devoted to racial and moral purity — their words, not mine — when Captain America, Iron Man, and Ms. Marvel show … Continue reading

Posted in Graphic Literature | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Allan Heinberg’s Avengers: The Children’s Crusade

Allan Heinberg’s Young Avengers

After reading Civil War: Young Avengers & Runaways, I decided that Young Avengers was one series I definitely wanted to follow up on. It was worth it. The story starts with the “Sidekicks” story line, and a full-page frame of … Continue reading

Posted in Graphic Literature | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Allan Heinberg’s Young Avengers

Jim Butcher’s Welcome to the Jungle

Jim Butcher has moved the Dresden Files into the realm of graphic novels with Welcome to the Jungle, a prequel of sorts to his series on the adventures of Harry Dresden, Chicago’s only wizard for hire. It looks open and … Continue reading

Posted in Graphic Literature | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Jim Butcher’s Welcome to the Jungle

James Asmus’ Quantum and Woody! Vol. 1: The World’s Worst Superhero Team

I’ll be very honest here: James Asmus’ Quantum and Woody! had me at the cover. How can you beat “The World’s Worst Superhero Team”? (And yes, there’s a goat.) Derek Henderson is a physicist who has been working on some … Continue reading

Posted in Graphic Literature | Tagged , , | Comments Off on James Asmus’ Quantum and Woody! Vol. 1: The World’s Worst Superhero Team

Alan Moore and Kevin O’Neill’s The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen; Jess Nevins’ Heroes and Monsters: The Unofficial Companion to The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen

Who among us hasn’t, at one time or another, played the “What if….” game with characters, ideas or settings we’ve found particularly appealing? Maybe we spin out a colourful yarn in our head, or if we’re inspired enough, we put … Continue reading

Posted in Graphic Literature | Tagged | Comments Off on Alan Moore and Kevin O’Neill’s The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen; Jess Nevins’ Heroes and Monsters: The Unofficial Companion to The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen

David Peterson’s Mouse Guard: Legends of the Guard, Vols. 1-3

Given the popularity and critical acclaim of David Peterson’s Mouse Guard series (as witness our own very positive review of the first book, Mouse Guard: Fall 1152), it was almost inevitable that there would be spin-offs. And indeed, Peterson has … Continue reading

Posted in Graphic Literature | Tagged , | Comments Off on David Peterson’s Mouse Guard: Legends of the Guard, Vols. 1-3

Justin Hall, ed., No Straight Lines

It’s tempting to say that comics underwent a radical transformation in the 1960s and ’70s. They didn’t. What did happen was that comics as a medium, with the rise of underground comics through the agency of R. Crumb and his … Continue reading

Posted in Graphic Literature | Tagged , , , | Comments Off on Justin Hall, ed., No Straight Lines

David Peterson’s The Art of The Mouse Guard: 2005 – 2015

Without doubt, the Mouse Guard series is one of the best illustrated graphic novel series I’ve ever had the pleasure to experience. It certainly ranks up with Bill Willingham’s Fables, Mike Mignola’s Hellboy and G. Willow Wilson’s Air for creating … Continue reading

Posted in Books | Tagged , , | Comments Off on David Peterson’s The Art of The Mouse Guard: 2005 – 2015

Recent Reading: Wolves, Wives, Knives, Curses, A Hospital, and a Henchgirl

The works read but yet to be reviewed are piling up, so here’s a new roundup to clear away part of the deluge. The Mere Wife by Maria Dahvana Headley is a retelling of Beowulf from the monster’s point of … Continue reading

Posted in Books | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Recent Reading: Wolves, Wives, Knives, Curses, A Hospital, and a Henchgirl

Alex Woolfson’s Artifice

I’m not sure how I ran across mention of Alex Woolfson’s Artifice, but I did. It originated as a Web comic, and what I saw of it interested me enough that I bought the hard copy. Deacon is a prototype … Continue reading

Posted in Graphic Literature | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Alex Woolfson’s Artifice

DC’s Justice League Action

Justice League Action is the latest animated series to be set in the DC universe. Unlike earlier series that were roughly twenty two to twenty four minutes long and had seasons of no more that twenty or so episodes, this … Continue reading

Posted in Film | Tagged , , | Comments Off on DC’s Justice League Action

A. Willow Wilson and M.K. Perker’s Air: Letters from Lost Countries

Blythe is not your typical airline attendant. Sure, she’s blonde, pretty and personable, playing into every conceivable stereotype there is. But Blythe is much more than that. For starters, she’s acrophobic, surviving each flight only through the wonders of modern … Continue reading

Posted in Graphic Literature | Tagged | Comments Off on A. Willow Wilson and M.K. Perker’s Air: Letters from Lost Countries

Simon Oliver’s Hellblazer, Vol. 1: The Poison Truth

John Constantine is back in London, after suffering exile in New York — the result of a curse by a demon that caused remaining in London to infect Constantine with a possibly fatal disease. But, as usual, Constantine has found … Continue reading

Posted in Graphic Literature | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Simon Oliver’s Hellblazer, Vol. 1: The Poison Truth

Gerard Way and Gabriel Ba’s The Umbrella Academy: Dallas

Gerard Way and Gabriel Ba have come up with what is one of the most original “superhero” series I’ve seen: The Umbrella Academy. It’s a group, all young, who have powers of one sort or another, but don’t look for … Continue reading

Posted in Graphic Literature | Tagged , | Comments Off on Gerard Way and Gabriel Ba’s The Umbrella Academy: Dallas

Joss Whedon’s Fray

I was, once uponn a time, one of a mere handful of people who had had no experience of the work of Joss Whedon. The others were, I’m sure, comfortably ensconced in caves in the Himalayas. (I’m a non-TV person. … Continue reading

Posted in Graphic Literature | Tagged , | Comments Off on Joss Whedon’s Fray

John Ostrander’s Suicide Squad: Trial by Fire

I first ran across the work of John Ostrander in his collaboration with Gail Simone in Secret Six: Danse Macabre. I had my reservations, but now that I’ve read what may be considered the forerunner to that series, Suicide Squad: … Continue reading

Posted in Graphic Literature | Tagged , | Comments Off on John Ostrander’s Suicide Squad: Trial by Fire

Roy Thomas and Gil Kane’s Richard Wagner’s The Ring of the Nibelung

It never would have occurred to me to make a graphic novel out of Wagner’s Ring cycle, but on reflection, it’s a natural — I mean, who is more a superhero than Siegfried, the son of a god, running around … Continue reading

Posted in Music | Tagged | Comments Off on Roy Thomas and Gil Kane’s Richard Wagner’s The Ring of the Nibelung

Hyouta Fujiyama’s Ordinary Crush, Vols. 1 & 2

Hyouta Fujiyama has become one of my favorite mangaka doing BL, mostly because of her strong, clean graphics and charming stories. (For some general remarks on BL, see my comments on Dash!.) In Ordinary Crush we have the core of … Continue reading

Posted in Graphic Literature | Tagged , | Comments Off on Hyouta Fujiyama’s Ordinary Crush, Vols. 1 & 2

Isaku Natsume’s Dash!

Isaku Natsume’s Dash represents an excellent example of the genre in shoujo manga (“manga for girls”) known in Japan as BL (boys’ love), bishonen-ai or shonen-ai, or, as is generally the case in the West, yaoi (pronounced, if one is … Continue reading

Posted in Graphic Literature | Tagged , | Comments Off on Isaku Natsume’s Dash!

Robert Venditti and Brett Weldele’s The Surrogates: Flesh and Bone

Flesh and Bone is a prequel to The Surrogates, taking the story back fifteen years to the anti-surrogate riots of 2039. The incident that sparks the crisis is the beating death of a derelict by three teenagers who are using … Continue reading

Posted in Graphic Literature | Tagged , , , | Comments Off on Robert Venditti and Brett Weldele’s The Surrogates: Flesh and Bone

Robert Venditti and Brett Weldele’s The Surrogates

Robert Venditti’s The Surrogates, drawn by Brett Weldele, is right up among the top graphic works I’ve run across recently. Set in a near-future megalopolis, it’s a fast-moving crime drama with a couple of unique twists. The central motivator in … Continue reading

Posted in Graphic Literature | Tagged , | Comments Off on Robert Venditti and Brett Weldele’s The Surrogates

Joss Whedon’s The Avengers

I’m generally not a big fan of translating superhero comics to live-action films. Christopher Nolan’s Batman films, so far, have tended to collapse under their own weight. Bryan Singer’s X-Men should have been titled Wolverine, and was a waste of … Continue reading

Posted in Film | Tagged , | Comments Off on Joss Whedon’s The Avengers

Keith Giffen’s Lobo: 100 Page Spectacular

Lobo is another of those DC characters with a somewhat checkered past. Introduced in 1983 as a hardened villain (with, in that incarnation, a short shelf life), he was resurrected in the early ’90s as one of a growing number … Continue reading

Posted in Graphic Literature | Tagged , | Comments Off on Keith Giffen’s Lobo: 100 Page Spectacular

Geoff Johns and Ivan Reis’ Blackest Night/Geoff Johns and Peter J. Tomasi’s Brightest Day, Vol. 1

Blackest Night and Brightest Day mark another DC “crossover event” in which pretty much everyone gets reinvented. These have become almost a requirement in superhero comics, I suspect because of the periodic necessity of reconciling the various universes occupied by … Continue reading

Posted in Graphic Literature | Tagged , | Comments Off on Geoff Johns and Ivan Reis’ Blackest Night/Geoff Johns and Peter J. Tomasi’s Brightest Day, Vol. 1

Grant Morrison’s Batman: The Return of Bruce Wayne

Batman has probably been rethought and retooled more than any other superhero, and The Return of Bruce Wayne, a six issue mini-series here collected in a hardback edition, gives us an extended reconstruction as Wayne works his way through history … Continue reading

Posted in Graphic Literature | Tagged , | Comments Off on Grant Morrison’s Batman: The Return of Bruce Wayne

Tony Bedard and Kevin VanHook’s Oracle: The Cure

You don’t really need tights and a cape to be a superhero. You don’t need super strength or mutant abilities. You don’t even have to have your body surgically or chemically altered. (Willingly or otherwise.) Mind, these things don’t hurt, … Continue reading

Posted in Graphic Literature | Tagged , | Comments Off on Tony Bedard and Kevin VanHook’s Oracle: The Cure

Roy Thomas and Barry Windsor-Smith’s The Chronicles of Conan, Vol. 1: The Tower of the Elephant and Other Stories; The Barry Windsor-Smith Archive: Conan, Volume 1

Once upon a time there was a young English illustrator who wanted to draw comics. He wanted to draw comics badly enough that he came to America with little more than the clothes on his back and a sheaf of … Continue reading

Posted in Graphic Literature | Tagged , | Comments Off on Roy Thomas and Barry Windsor-Smith’s The Chronicles of Conan, Vol. 1: The Tower of the Elephant and Other Stories; The Barry Windsor-Smith Archive: Conan, Volume 1

Roy Thomas, et al., The Chronicles of Kull, Volume 1: A King Comes Riding and Other Stories

Before there was Conan, there was Kull! At least, so we were reminded on any number of covers of comics featuring stories about Robert E. Howard’s Kull, the spiritual forerunner of Conan. Kull was arguably the most important of Howard’s … Continue reading

Posted in Graphic Literature | Tagged , | Comments Off on Roy Thomas, et al., The Chronicles of Kull, Volume 1: A King Comes Riding and Other Stories

Peter Milligan and Davide Gianfelice’s Greek Street: Cassandra Complex

I’m sure you’ve heard the song “Brush Up Your Shakespeare” from Kiss Me, Kate. Well, in the case of Peter Milligan and Davide Gianfelice’s Greek Street, it should go “Brush Up Your Aeschylus.” And Sophocles. And Euripides. Because you’re going … Continue reading

Posted in Graphic Literature | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Peter Milligan and Davide Gianfelice’s Greek Street: Cassandra Complex

Peter Milligan and Davide Gianfelice’s Greek Street: Blood Calls for Blood

Greek Street: Blood Calls for Blood is the first compilation of the individual numbers of the comic series. It offers another retelling of the Greek myths, translated to the seamy underbelly of a contemporary city — in this case, London’s … Continue reading

Posted in Graphic Literature | Tagged , , | Comments Off on Peter Milligan and Davide Gianfelice’s Greek Street: Blood Calls for Blood

Alexander Irvine and Tomm Coker’s Daredevil Noir

One has come to expect tight, absorbing writing from Alexander Irvine, and one is not disappointed in the Daredevil installment of the Marvel Noir series. Daredevil is not one of those superheroes who’s been very much on my radar, so … Continue reading

Posted in Graphic Literature | Tagged , | Comments Off on Alexander Irvine and Tomm Coker’s Daredevil Noir

Aya Kanno’s Blank Slate

Aya Kanno’s Blank Slate is the sort of thing that turns up in manga from time to time — a grim story peopled by some frightening characters, all wrapped in gorgeous drawing. I will say, however, that I didn’t expect … Continue reading

Posted in Graphic Literature | Tagged , | Comments Off on Aya Kanno’s Blank Slate

Kazuya Minekura’s Wild Adapter, Vols. 1-5

Kazuya Minekura is a well-known manga artist responsible for, among other things, Saiyuki and Araiso Private High School Student Council Executive Committee, which I have only seen in anime and which, believe it or not, is directly relevant to Wild … Continue reading

Posted in Graphic Literature | Tagged , | Comments Off on Kazuya Minekura’s Wild Adapter, Vols. 1-5

Si Spencer and Dean Ormiston’s The Books of Magick: Life During Wartime: Book One

Life During Wartime represents a distinct break with The Books of Magic as it had been developed by Neil Gaiman and John Ney Rieber. Si Spencer, working with Gaiman, “updated” the characters and took them into a new set of … Continue reading

Posted in Graphic Literature | Tagged | Comments Off on Si Spencer and Dean Ormiston’s The Books of Magick: Life During Wartime: Book One

John Ney Rieber’s The Books of Magic

John Ney Rieber, Gary Amaro, Peter Gross, The Books of Magic: Bindings (Vertigo, 1995) John Ney Rieber, Peter Gross, Peter Snejbjerg, Gary Amaro, Dick Giordiano, The Books of Magic: Summonings (Vertigo, 1996) John Ney Rieber, Peter Snejbjerg, Peter Gross, John … Continue reading

Posted in Graphic Literature | Tagged , , | Comments Off on John Ney Rieber’s The Books of Magic

Neil Gaiman’s The Books of Magic

Neil Gaiman’s The Books of Magic — the original story, not the series — began when DC Comics approached Gaiman about doing a series that would bring together the “magic” characters of the DC Universe. Gaiman created the character of … Continue reading

Posted in Graphic Literature | Tagged , | Comments Off on Neil Gaiman’s The Books of Magic

Diana Schutz and Tim Sale’s Grendel: Devil Child

Devil Child, written by Diana Schutz and drawn by Tim Sale, tells the story of Hunter Rose’s adopted child, Stacy Palumbo, and the birth of her daughter, Christine Spar, who became the next Grendel. The story is a narrative by … Continue reading

Posted in Graphic Literature | Tagged , | Comments Off on Diana Schutz and Tim Sale’s Grendel: Devil Child

Matt Wagner’s Batman/Grendel

Matt Wagner did two crossover series, the first a joint effort between Comico, his publisher at the time, and DC Comics, and the second between Dark Horse and DC, to bring together Grendel and Batman. In the first mini-series, originally … Continue reading

Posted in Graphic Literature | Tagged , | Comments Off on Matt Wagner’s Batman/Grendel

Matt Wagner’s Grendel: Devil Quest

Matt Wagner’s Grendel has been a phenomenally successful series practically from its beginning in Comico’s Primer in 1982. Due to the vicissitudes of the comics industry, however, it’s been somewhat sporadic. Despite that, it has become successful enough, and important … Continue reading

Posted in Graphic Literature | Tagged , | Comments Off on Matt Wagner’s Grendel: Devil Quest

Matt Wagner’s Grendel: Devil by the Deed

Matt Wagner’s Grendel, as I’ve mentioned before, was in many ways revolutionary. In spite of the initial, mostly negative, reaction, it proved to be one of the milestones in the development of comics as a form. Some of the thematic … Continue reading

Posted in Graphic Literature | Tagged , | Comments Off on Matt Wagner’s Grendel: Devil by the Deed

Matt Wagner’s Grendel Archives

Matt Wagner was one of a generation of writers and artists who essentially remade comics in the 1980s. This does not count R. Crumb and the others who opened comics up to new modes of expression (and content) in the … Continue reading

Posted in Graphic Literature | Tagged | Comments Off on Matt Wagner’s Grendel Archives

Paul Dini, Dustin Nguyen, and Derek Fridolfs’ Batman: Streets of Gotham: Hush Money

Streets of Gotham: Hush Money is another installment in the Batman Reborn series (or should I call it a “universe”?), and another in which Tommy Elliott, the villain Hush and Bruce Wayne’s good friend and bitter enemy, plays a large … Continue reading

Posted in Graphic Literature | Tagged , | Comments Off on Paul Dini, Dustin Nguyen, and Derek Fridolfs’ Batman: Streets of Gotham: Hush Money

Paul Dini and Carlos D’Anda’s Batman: Arkham City

Splashed across the bottom of the dust jacket to Arkham City is “The lead-in to the highly anticipated video game!” Let that be a warning. Batman and the Joker got into it in a big way a year ago, with … Continue reading

Posted in Graphic Literature | Tagged , | Comments Off on Paul Dini and Carlos D’Anda’s Batman: Arkham City