Category Archives: Music

Gianluigi Trovesi and Gianni Coscia’s La misteriosa musica della Regina Loana

It was on a particularly melancholy night as summer faded to autumn that I first heard the exquisite, sad and slow rendering of “Moonlight Serenade” by Gianluigi Trovesi and Gianni Coscia on their 2019 album that is a tribute to … Continue reading

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Altan at Massey Hall

Altan were one of the first truly traditional groups I came to love, and they will always be one of my favorites! I hadnít seen Altan in five years or so–last time was at the World Theater in St. Paul–so … Continue reading

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Dori Freeman’s Every Single Star

In the three years since her self-titled debut took the Americana world by surprise and garnered critical and popular acclaim, Dori Freeman has gone through a lot of changes. The songs on Dori Freeman mostly centered around the breakup she … Continue reading

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Ethan Iverson Quartet’s Common Practice

I took in a set of avant-garde acoustic jazz by trumpeter Tom Harrell and his piano-less quartet at the Village Vanguard in 2018. It was a mesmerizing but at times puzzlingly opaque (for me) set from Harrell, who was voted … Continue reading

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Enrico Rava and Joe Lovano’s Roma

Italian jazz is a world all its own, one which I’ve only barely begun to explore. But even I know and love the great Enrico Rava, the 80-year-old flugelhornist and composer and eminence gris. In late 2018 he joined up … Continue reading

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Calennig’s A Gower Garland

One of my favourite places in the world is the Gower, a small peninsula southwest of Swansea in Wales. There is nothing more soothing than standing on the hills overlooking Rhossili Bay and Worm´s Head watching the hang gliders using … Continue reading

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Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra’s Jazz And Art

Jazz at Lincoln Center is doing as much as any other institution in America to preserve and promote jazz music. In addition to the regular program Jazz Night in America in conjunction with NPR and WBGO, there’s the Jazz at … Continue reading

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Avishai Cohen and Yonathan Avishai’s Playing The Room

The overall impression I got of New York-based Israeli-born trumpeter Avishai Cohen’s playing when I saw him in Portland, Ore., a few years ago was of control. The young man is capable of many levels of nuance, but he seems … Continue reading

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Bob Johnson and Peter Knight’s The King of Elfland’s Daughter (Another Review)

“We would be ruled by a magic lord.” Be careful what you ask for. On hiatus from Steeleye Span, Johnson and Knight tackled a musical project that seems mostly to have been ignored. Adapting Lord Dunsany’s classic parable on marriage, … Continue reading

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Clumsy Lovers’ After the Flood

Craig Clarke penned this review. The Clumsy Lovers call their music “raging bluegrass Celtic rock.” Now, I don’t know about “raging,” but there’s an infectious energy that permeates every song on their latest release, After the Flood. Fast fiddling (from … Continue reading

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Clumsy Lovers’ Barnburner

The Clumsy Lovers play raucous, uptempo Celtic-based rock with all kinds of Pacific Rim influences. Based in the Vancouver, B.C., area, the Lovers incorporate Californian and Hawaiian folk-rock, reggae and ska into their lively musical brew. The band writes much … Continue reading

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Rambling House’s Demo EP

So an unassuming little CD that (unusually) came my way by direct courtesy of Green Man‘s Chief Editor, Cat Eldridge. It’s a four-track ‘demo’ CD by an Australian band called Rambling House, whose membership (according to the booklet) comprises: ‘Paul’ … Continue reading

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Karan Casey’s Songlines

Songlines is Casey’s solo debut album, after her work with the Irish American traditional group Solas. It is produced by Solas founder Seamus Egan (tin whistle, flutes) with assistance from fellow band members Winifred Horan (fiddle) and John Doyle (guitar), … Continue reading

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Eliza Carthy’s Angels & Cigarettes

Eliza Carthy is the crown princess of English folk music. Her mother Norma Waterson, has been singing traditional music her whole life, and her father Martin Carthy is a seminal guitarist/singer whose arrangement of “Scarborough Fair” gave Paul Simon his … Continue reading

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Eliza Carthy’s Rough Music

Eliza Carthy is a fiddler, singer and folk babe extraordinaire. Rough Music is her latest album. Released in 2005, it’s taken a while for us to review it because…well…I guess I would rather listen to it than write about it! … Continue reading

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Humbird’s Pharmakon

This new album by Humbird is promoted as “experimental.” At first blush, it sounds anything but. Humbird is a project of Minneapolis-based singer-songwriter (and pizza waitress) Siri Undlin, working with several other local musicians. As the album opens on an … Continue reading

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Steeleye Span, Trinity Theatre & Arts Centre

Tony Wighton contributed this review. Trinity Theatre / Arts Centre, Tunbridge Wells, England. 2nd October 1998…. The first UK gig of Steeleye Span since Maddy Prior left in October 1997. Well, having given the new album a good airing I … Continue reading

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Steeleye Span on The Reunion Tour

Being an ardent fan of the band for the past 35 years, a chance to go and see them again was just too good to pass up. My home is in Chester, which is only about 35 miles away from … Continue reading

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Steeleye Span at the Daneside Theatre, Congleton

Chris Woods who is not related to anyone mentioned in this review This is one of those situations that throw into sharp relief the difficulties of writing live reviews. Lahri, one of our US reviewers, went to one of the … Continue reading

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Steeleye Span at The Iron Horse Music Hall

Lahri Bond Penned this gig report.  For many, this was the first chance to see the new Millennium version of a perennial favorite of the English folk-rock era. Steeleye Span has been through numerous changes in the last few years, … Continue reading

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Steeleye Span’s Steeleye Span In Concert

Debbie Skolnik penned this review. Steeleye Span have released many albums over their 31 years of making music. Most of them are studio albums; only a handful of the official releases are live concert performances. One such album is 1994’s … Continue reading

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Steeleye Span’s Live At A Distance

At first glance, it seemed like only a short while since the previous Steeleye Span double live CD Folk Rock Pioneers In Concert was released. But it was in fact more than two years ago, so the celebration of the … Continue reading

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Pogues’ The Ultimate Collection

The Pogues have a lot to answer for. I blame them for every half-assed Celtic Rock band filled with musicians who learned to play on stage and couldn’t make it at a slow session to save their lives. As GMR … Continue reading

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Jock Tamson’s Bairns’ Rare

With almost 20 years between their second and third album, a mere four years waiting for their fourth is less than we had reason to fear. And yes, the line up is the same as last time, Derek Hoy, John … Continue reading

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Fairport Convention and Assorted Guests’ Cropredy Capers: 1979 – 2003

This is the story of the twenty five August weekends which led me there –the story of a band falling apart and coming together, of miracles and mishaps, of weather from the sublime to the ridiculous, of a village whose … Continue reading

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Oysterband’s Granite Years — Best of . . . 1986-97

I guess I pretty much rank as the GMR staff newbie as far as the Oysterband is concerned. Mind you, that’s not really surprising: my musical background is pretty much evenly split between the romantic repertoire and post-everything metal/electronica, preferably … Continue reading

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Rosanne Cash’ Blue Moons and Broken Hearts: the Anthology 1979-1996

Rosanne Cash is the daughter of the legendary Johnny Cash and his first wife Vivian. She has a brand new album out which is being strongly promoted. This disc, Blue Moons and Broken Hearts is an anthology of her earlier … Continue reading

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Linda Ronstadt and Ann Savoy’s Adieu False Heart

Ever since they first sang together on the 2002 Vanguard album Evangeline Made, I’ve been waiting for Linda Ronstadt and Ann Savoy to put out another record. Here it is, and it was worth the wait. Adieu False Heart is … Continue reading

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Linda Ronstadt & Emmylou Harris’ Western Wall — The Tucson Sessions

For me, this is very much a case of old heroes returning. Who could help but be infatuated by the lovely Ms Ronstadt in the middle of the Seventies? She had it all: looks, voice and a clever choice of … Continue reading

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Rolling Stones’ Forty Licks

The Rolling Stones! What the heck are the Rolling Stones doing in Green Man Review!?!? Having tapped virtually every other place in the world for source material have they finally created the album of Elizabethan folk music that “Lady Jane” … Continue reading

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Oysterband’s Ways of Holding on (Waiting for the Sun)

The Oyster lads are at it again, giving us tantalizing glimpses of their activities, re-formulating songs as the whim takes them or the collaborator appears. This time it’s Emma Härdelin, of Garmana and Triakel, performing “Ways of Holding on (Waiting … Continue reading

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Oysterband’s Pearls from the Oysters

This thirty track, two disc set chronicles the Oysterband’s middle years, the mid- to late-’80s when they cranked up the volume, pounded out a rock beat and emphasized left-wing politics. Something on the order of Billy Bragg meets Fairport Convention. … Continue reading

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Modern Nature’s How To Live

I may not be listening to Modern Nature’s How To Live right, but know what? I don’t care! And somehow I don’t think frontman Jack Cooper would care much, either. Modern Nature is a new project for Cooper, who also … Continue reading

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Oysterband’s Deserters

Contrary to what the liner notes in the recent Pearls from the Oysters compilation suggest, the finest period in the Oysterband’s long and illustrious history was the three CD arc that began with Deserters and culminated in The Shouting End … Continue reading

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Mozaik’s Live from the Powerhouse

In the late 1960s, an aspiring young Irish folk musician named Andy Irvine traveled through the Balkans. He jammed with local folk musicians everywhere he went, and absorbed the different traditions of the region. Irvine then brought these Balkan influences … Continue reading

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Lais’ Dorothea

Lais is a unique group that has no equivalent, to my knowledge, anywhere in the world of music. This seven-piece band from the Flemish region of Belgium is fronted by three alluring young women, Jorunn Bauweraerts, Annelies Brosens and Nathalie … Continue reading

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Kila’s Lemonade and Buns

When listening to traditional Irish music, it’s often possible to sense an ancient tribal rhythm lurking beneath the surface, the hint of a wild beat that must have been driven by frenzied drums with the power to set the soul … Continue reading

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JSD Band’s Pastures of Plenty

Pastures of Plenty, which is their new album, comes after a slight break for the band as they persued other interests — 25 years to be precise. (It is actually their second CD after the long break, but the first … Continue reading

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JSD Band’s JSD Band

Peter Bell penned this review. The second album by the JSD Band was released in 1972 with declamatory sleeve notes by John Peel (the hippest man alive at the time). It included this account of a typical gig by this … Continue reading

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Horslips’ Horslips Greatest Hits

Ed Dale penned this review. If you missed the Horslips the first time around — they disbanded in 1980 after 10 years together — here’s a chance to hear a small piece of their ground-breaking work. Horslips Greatest Hits is … Continue reading

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Horslips’ Happy to Meet, Sorry to Part

Joe Karrman Penned this review. It’s not many bands that can claim to have invented a whole musical genre, but that’s what Horslips are credited with. Without them we wouldn’t have Celtic Rock. Of course Fairport Convention had been rocking … Continue reading

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Various Artists’ Nua Teorainn

Patrick O’Donnell Penned this review. We’ve been taught since birth that change is constant. Each day is followed by a new day, each year by a new year, each bringing something just a little different than before. We’ve also been … Continue reading

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Patrick Street’s Live from Patrick Street

Patrick Street was something of an Irish supergroup when they first saw the light of day in 1986. Then as now they were a four piece group, all of them musicians with a sound reputation and an impressive history. Three … Continue reading

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Patrick Street’s Street Life

Pat Simmonds penned this review. One of the great things about Patrick Street is that they are so dependable. Despite a few personnel changes and challenges over the years the central core has remained the same as has the musical … Continue reading

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Modest Mouse’s The Lonesome Crowded West

Jessica Skolnik penned this review. Modest Mouse is already being heralded in some circles as one of the bands that saved indie rock from sluggish lo-fi self-indulgence, but I would like to further propose that the trio of Isaac Brock … Continue reading

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Susan McKeown, Cathie Ryan, and Robin Spielberg’s Mother: Songs Celebrating Mothers & Motherhood and Susan McKeown and Lindsey Horner’s Mighty Rain

Meredith Tarr penned this review. Irish singer, songwriter, and vocalist Susan McKeown, originally of Dublin but now emigrated to New York City, is widely considered to be one of the fastest rising stars in contemporary music. She has released several … Continue reading

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Susan McKeown’s Blackthorn: Irish Love Songs

Christopher Conder Penned this review. New Yorker Susan McKeown has been gradually establishing a reputation as a classy and innovative interpreter of Irish traditional song for some time, without ever gaining the breakthrough she deserves. On first appearances, Blackthorn appears … Continue reading

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Susan McKeown’s Lowlands

Patrick O’Donnell penned this review. If there is magic in music, Susan McKeown surely is a mage, for how else can her enchanting vocals and entangling arrangements be explained? Her amber tones weave a spell when first they are heard, … Continue reading

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Brian McNeill’s To Answer The Peacock

Debbie Skolnik penned this review. This CD is subtitled “Music For The Scottish Fiddle,” and that’s exactly what it’s all about — the fiddle takes center stage in this recording, dancing its heart out, strutting its stuff like … well, … Continue reading

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Brian McNeill’s The Busker And The Devil’s Only Daughter

Debbie Skolnik penned this review. There is more to Brian McNeill’s albums than just the music they contain, although if you put one on without knowing a thing about McNeill, reading the liner notes or even looking at the song/tune … Continue reading

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