Category Archives: Books

Steven Brust’s Jhereg

Jhereg is the first book in Steven Brust’s Taltos Cycle, the story of Vlad Taltos, human, as opposed to Dragaeran (also “Easterner”, the East being inhabited by humans), crime boss, assassin. Note: That’s first in order publication, not first chronologically … Continue reading

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Gregory Frost’s Fitcher’s Brides

This review was written by Deborah J. Brannon for an earlier version of GMR. Fitcher’s Brides, by Gregory Frost, is one of the most recent additions to Terri Windling’s excellent brainchild, The Fairy Tale Series. As such, it shares shelf … Continue reading

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Tanya Huff’s The Smoke Trilogy: Smoke and Shadows, Smoke and Mirrors, Smoke and Ashes

One thing that I find marginally irritating about some of my favorite fantasy and science fiction writers is that if I don’t pay attention for a minute or two, they start a new series and then I have to catch … Continue reading

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Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett’s Good Omens, (The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch)

Neil Gaiman (Caroline) and Terry Pratchett (Thud, Where’s My Cow?) are world class fantasists and giants of popular literature. But back in 1990, when they were, in their own description, “not yet Neil Gaiman and just barely Terry Pratchett” (Locus, … Continue reading

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Neil Gaiman’s M Is for Magic

This review was written by Deborah J. Brannon for an earlier site. There is a child who burns with curiosity, who is full of the Wood. He knows there are scary things in the world, and amazing things too. This … Continue reading

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Douglas Clegg’s Isis: A Tale of the Supernatural

This review was written by Faith J. Cormier for a previous incarnation of GMR. Have you ever read “The Monkey’s Paw” by W. W. Jacobs? It’s a nasty little story that proves quite graphically that bringing the dead back to … Continue reading

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Frank de Caro and Rosan Augusta Jordan’s Re-Situating Folklore: Folk Contexts and Twentieth-Century Literature and Art

While the authors of Re-Situating Folklore are concerned largely with the relationship between folklore and literature, what they describe is something that happens across the spectrum of “high art” and the vernacular: folklore, or the vernacular (which is the ultimate … Continue reading

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Diana Gabaldon’s Outlander

It’s 2006, and the sixth novel of Diana Gabaldon’s Outlander series, A Breath of Snow and Ashes, has just recently won the 2006 Quill Award in the Science Fiction/Fantasy/Horror category. For some of you, it may be 2007 or beyond, … Continue reading

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Michael Streissguth’s Johnny Cash at Folsom Prison: The Making of a Masterpiece

Craig Clarke wrote this lovely review. Johnny Cash at Folsom Prison is one of the dozen or so albums that I continually return to. Its snapshot of a moment in time is history and entertainment rolled into a musically important … Continue reading

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Charles Stross’ Glasshouse

J.S.S. Boyce penned this review. Memory, identity, humanity. Classic science fiction points of inquiry, and Glasshouse has them in spades. We start out the story with our protagonist, Robin, who is in a sort of recovery clinic from major memory … Continue reading

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Farah Mendlesohn, ed., On Joanna Russ

Anyone who wants to discuss science fiction since the mid-1960s, particularly with reference to sf’s increasing willingness to ponder questions of sexuality and gender, had better know their Joanna Russ. Happily, Farah Mendlesohn has, in On Joanna Russ, made that … Continue reading

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Madeleine L’Engle‘s Kairos Novels

This Library of America collection includes the eight novels most readily associated with L’Engle’s A Wrinkle in Time, including that book itself. These are divided in this instance into two smart little volumes, The Wrinkle in Time Quartet and The … Continue reading

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Naomi Booth’s Sealed

“Oh lord, keep me safe from harm. Oh lord, keep me safe from my skin.” This is a first novel? Wow. Absolutely stunning. Feels a bit like Shirley Jackson’s We Have Always Lived in the Castle or Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s … Continue reading

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Roger Zelazny’s Lord of Light

No’am Newman penned this review. I first came across the strangely named Roger Zelazny in 1973-4, when I borrowed a friend’s copy of “The Science Fiction Hall Of Fame,” which is composed of short stories published in the pre-Nebula era. … Continue reading

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Aliens Omnibus Volume 7: “Criminal Enterprise” and “No Exit”

There are four films in the original Alien franchise. Two extra if you’re counting the amusing but unremarkable Alien vs. Predator films, which are more fun than the two sloppy prequels. Want more? Okay; there’s a movie adaptation for each … Continue reading

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R. F. Foster’s Luck and the Irish: A Brief History of Change, 1970-2000

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Malachy McCourt’s The Claddagh Ring

The Claddagh ring is a ring fronted by a crowned heart held in two hands; usually gold (although I have seen them in silver), it symbolizes “friendship, loyalty and love.” Irish in origin, it has a rich history in Irish … Continue reading

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Roger Zelazny (writer) and David G. Grubbs, Christopher S. Kovacs, and Ann Crimmins (editors)’ Threshold, Volume One of The Collected Stories of Roger Zelazny

It was just past the Gloaming one summer evening when the postman made a special delivery to the Green Man mailroom, a rather large and quite sturdy package that contained the first four volumes of the six volume set of … Continue reading

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Lucy Burningham,  My Beer Year

With the subtitle of “Adventures with hop farmers, craft brewers, chefs, beer sommeliers & fanatical drinkers as a beer master in training”, it sounds like a lot to dig into. And it is; the Master Cicerone is beer’s equivalent to … Continue reading

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Jen Agg, I Hear She’s A Real Bitch

A look behind the kitchen door, into the world of restaurants, chefs and what it takes to thrive in this business, Agg’s unflinching look at her life feels like a master class in the art of running a restaurant, but … Continue reading

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Brian James Freeman (ed.), Reading Stephen King

I remember being eleven years old, clutching a shiny new paperback copy of The Shining. (Yes, my parents bought it for me. They were cool with me reading anything, as long as I was reading.) These essays may be preaching … Continue reading

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Angus Macallan’s The Gates of Stone

The religion centering on the Martyr is such a shoddy and obvious reference to Christianity that I cannot help but think that the likes of C.S. Lewis and Phillip Pullman would have a right to roll their eyes and comment … Continue reading

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Lisa Yaszek’s The Future Is Female!

The Future is Female! represents The Library of America’s continued efforts to provide authoritative volumes on any given subject. This is a large collection, featuring twenty five stories that show a wide rang of fiction. In addition, there are notations … Continue reading

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Leife Shallcross’s The Beast’s Heart

The retelling of fairy tales is a time honored tradition. As a result, Leife Shallcross’s The Beast’s Heart is in excellent company. This volume attempts to do a perspective flip, by focusing upon the Beast of Beauty and the Beast … Continue reading

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A Trio of Nonfiction Book Reviews for the End of Winter

Here’s a look at three books I’ve had to myself for far too long… Brian James Freeman (ed.), Reading Stephen King I remember being eleven years old, clutching a shiny new paperback copy of The Shining. (Yes, my parents bought … Continue reading

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Anthony Bourdain’s “The Nasty Bits”

(To keep things on the up-n-up, I must confess this is a re-print of the piece I wrote back in ’06. I could change tenses, and/or mention Bourdain’s passing, but I’m still in denial. So here ’tis, unsullied by the … Continue reading

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Jorie Graham’s The Dream of a Unified Field

Jorie Graham has been honored in just about every way it is possible for America to honor a poet, including the 1996 Pulitzer Prize for poetry for The Dream of a Unified Field, a selection of poems from 1974 to … Continue reading

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Liz Williams’ The Demon and the City

Elizabeth Vail is the author of this review. In this second instalment in Liz William’s creative and highly enjoyable Detective Inspector Chen series about the futuristic Chinese city Singapore Three, its favourite paranormal police officer Chen and his squabbles with … Continue reading

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Robin Williamson’s Four Gruagach Tales

Tim Hoke penned this review. Various Internet sources define a gruagach as a creature similar to brownie. In these tales, however — and Robin Williamson claims to draw from traditional Irish and Highland Scottish sources — a gruagach is a … Continue reading

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Jesse L. Byock’s Saga of the Volsungs: The Norse Epic of Sigurd the Dragon Slayer

Volsungasaga is the Norse version of the pan-Germanic epic that shows its southern persona in Das Nieblungenlied. Like so many national epics, it is a series of stories linked by a folk hero, in this case Sigurd (Siegfried in the … Continue reading

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Ellen Kushner and Delia Sherman’s The Fall of the Kings

Ellen Kushner’s first novel was Swordspoint, a romantic fantasy set in a universe strongly reminiscent of Jacobean and Restoration London, with admixtures of the Elizabethan and Georgian eras – life is bigger than life, intrigue is rampant, the City, which … Continue reading

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Harold Bloom’s Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human

When it comes to Shakespeare, everyone is entitled to an opinion. When it comes to Yale professor, MacArthur fellow, and self- confessed “Bardolater,” Harold Bloom, you’re entitled to his opinion, as well. And in the 700-plus pages of Shakespeare: The … Continue reading

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Christa Faust and Gary Phillips, DC Comics novels – Batman: The Killing Joke

“Bullock moved like he was chasing a naked woman carrying a plate of barbecued ribs.”* Tritan’s first foray into novelizing classic DC comics stories dives into the Joker’s most infamous tale; The Killing Joke. When this novelization came to me … Continue reading

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Alexandre Dumas’ The Three Musketeers [trans. By Lowell Bair]

Alexandre Dumas père was, in real life, a character as colorful as his heroes. He was the son of Napoleon’s famous mulatto general, Dumas, became a successful playwright, had numerous mistresses, took part in the revolution of 1830, spent extravagantly, … Continue reading

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C.R. Maguire‘s A Whovian Feast: A Doctor Who Inspired Cookbook for Discriminating Fans and Chris-Rachael Oseland’s Dining with The Doctor

This review is really an acknowledgement that there’s a nearly inifinite number of writings about Doctor Who done by the fans of the show over the past fifty years. Yes there’s fanfic where they’ve created their own stories, some using … Continue reading

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Anthony Burdge, Jessica Burke, Kristine Larsen (editors), The Mythological Dimensions of Doctor Who

With essays covering the entire span of the various Doctor Who television series from 1963 onward, The Mythological Dimensions of Doctor Who addresses various ideas of The Doctor as a mythic figure. Unfortunately, the central premise — the idea that … Continue reading

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Tanya Huff’s The Second Summoning

Tanya Huff’s The Second Summoning is, as might be expected, a sequel to Summon the Keeper. It is just as wryly funny, with the attitude we’ve come to expect from Huff, and is sometimes surprisingly insightful about the trials and … Continue reading

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Peter S. Beagle and Jacob Weisman‘s The Unicorn Anthology

An anthology is always an interesting read, filled with multiple narratives and styles and as a result uneven by nature. The Unicorn Anthology, edited by Peter S. Beagle and Jacob Weisman, is one which comes with a plainly stated theme. … Continue reading

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Arnie Fenner and Cathy Fenner’s John Jude Palencar: Origins: The Art of John Jude Palenca

Eye candy is good and I always enjoy it — particularly really great eye candy. Eye candy is anything that’s most remarkable for its visual appeal. The term is often interpreted as derogatory, implying that the object relies solely upon … Continue reading

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Ursula LeGuin’s The Books of Earthsea: The Complete Illustrated Edition

In October, Saga Press released Ursula LeGuin’s collected Earthsea works, beautifully illustrated by Charles Vess. This collection includes the original trilogy: A Wizard of Earthsea (1968), The Tombs of Atuan (1971 ) and The Farthest Shore (1972), as well as … Continue reading

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Billy Collins’ Questions About Angels

Billy Collins served two successive terms as Poet Laureate of the United States, the highest honor this country can give a poet. Born in 1942 in New York City, Collins has published numerous collections and garnered, among other recognition, fellowships … Continue reading

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Charles de Lint’s A Handful of Coppers: Collected Early Stories, Volume 1– Heroic Fantasy

I haven’t read every bit of fiction Charles de Lint has written, but I’m working on it. This newest collection of stories, A Handful of Coppers, brings me a little closer. In it are tales, as the subtitle says, of … Continue reading

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Charles de Lint’s Svaha

Svaha is Charles de Lint’s science-fiction novel. It seems that every fantasy writer must write at least one science-fiction novel, just as every science fiction writer must experiment with fantasy of one sort or another. As a dystopian, post-Apocalypse science … Continue reading

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Excerpt from The Old Oak Chronicles: Interviews with Famous Personages by Professor Arnel Rootmuster (Royal Library Press; Old Oak Wood, 2008)

Our next interview is with the youngest faery to have ever have won the King’s Oak Leaf, awarded for extraordinary valor in service to the Faery King and Queen. Sneezlewort Rootmuster Rowanberry Boggs the Seventh is a mere 209 years … Continue reading

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Pat Cadigan and Paul Dini’s DC Comics Novels – Harley Quinn: Mad Love

“If resistance to Batman was a crime, then crime was a revolutionary act.” Everybody loves Harley Quinn. Well maybe Batman thinks she’s kind of a pain, but let’s not talk about him right now, shall we? Harley’s today’s star, and … Continue reading

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J.M. Barrie’s Peter Pan

Marian McHugh penned this review. Peter Pan is a classic tale that has been enjoyed by many generations since its original publication in 1911. Barrie originally wrote Peter Pan as a play around 1903 but due to its success Barrie … Continue reading

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Constantine Cavafy, The Complete Poems of Cavafy

Modern Greece has produced an amazing body of literature including works by such luminaries as Nikos Kazantzakis, George Seferis, and others. One of the most significant members of this select community is the poet Constantine Cavafy. The Complete Poems of … Continue reading

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William Eggleston and John Szarkowski, William Eggleston’s Guide

William Eggleston is one of a small group of people who created color photography as a viable medium in art. William Eggleston’s Guide, the catalogue for an exhibition of his work at the Museum of Modern Art in 1976, is … Continue reading

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Tim Burton’s The Melancholy Death of Oyster Boy & Other Stories

The universe of Tim Burton  is shielded by a thin curtain. This little book  is worth a look  to see inside the mind behind  the epic movie-making grind.  From Frankenweenie to Batman,  Pee Wee Herman, Edward Scissorhand.  A world exists, … Continue reading

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Dave Pegg and Nigel Schofield’s Off the Pegg

Dave Pegg has been in the music business for more than 50 years. He started out on the Birmingham pop scene in the middle of the 1960s, first as a guitarist then turning to bass. He played in various groups … Continue reading

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