Category Archives: Books

Algernon Blackwood’s Roarings From Further Out: Four Weird Novellas by Algernon Blackwood

Algernon Blackwood is a  formative influence in the weird fiction genre, with his works “The Wendigo” and “The Willows” being staples. Editor Xavier Aldana Reyes collects not only those stories but two less well-known novellas by the author in Roarings … Continue reading

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Eric Saward’s Doctor Who: Resurrection of the Daleks

There have long been a number of noticeable gaps in the novelizations of the original television series of Doctor Who. With Eric Saward now the novelising his own Resurrection of the Daleks, those gaps have become one fewer. The book … Continue reading

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Marc Luber and Brett Cohen’s Stuff Every Sushi Lover Should Know

In guide books there are typically the introductory and the exhaustive. Brett Cohen and Mark Luber’s Stuff Every Sushi Lover Should Know falls in the former category. It does so, however, by pressing an impressive amount of information into a … Continue reading

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Helen Ward’s The Town Mouse and the Country Mouse

You’ve undoubtedly heard this story, or at the very least heard of it, probably under some variation of “The Country Mouse and the City Mouse,” or the reverse. It’s a well-loved children’s story that has received innumerable treatments throughout the … Continue reading

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Steven Brust’s Cowboy Feng’s Space Bar and Grill

I’m a fiddler. I like Steven Brust. I love most any novel with folk music as a theme, particularly when musicians are the characters. So why the fuck did I find Cowboy Feng’s Space Bar and Grill to be not … Continue reading

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Ramsey Campbell’s The Grin of the Dark

Much of what we call comedy is not quite as harmless or as amusing as we like to picture it. From the classic pratfall to the traditional Punch and Judy show to the slapstick — a stage prop which gave … Continue reading

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Ursula K. Le Guin’s Always Coming Home (Author’s Expanded Edition)

The collection of material relating to a respected novel can be difficult, but the library of America usually produces excellent results. Always Coming Home: Author’s Expanded Edition brings together much material relating to the title story by Ursula Le Guin. … Continue reading

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Guy Frasier-Sampson’s What Would Wimsey Do

A tribute to Golden Age mystery fiction is always welcomed, and a specific tribute to Peter Wimsey is a welcome surprise. What Would Wimsey Do? is Guy Fraser-Samson’s tribute to that great detectives, in the form of a more contemporary … Continue reading

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Steve Rasnic Tem’s The Night Doctor and Other Stories

Centipede Press is known for putting out quality volumes, and The Night Doctor and Other Stories by Steve Rasnic Tem is no exception. A long-running, highly celebrated author, Rasnic here offers a collection of his more recent short stories, including … Continue reading

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Ray Bradbury’s The Halloween Tree

William P. Simmons Penned this review. “Halloween. Sly does it. Tiptoe catspaws. Slide and creep. But why? What for? How? When! Where did it all begin?” In his typically enlightening and always entertaining style, Ray Bradbury puts his cold hand … Continue reading

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Clay McLeod Chapman’s The Remaking

Stories about stories can be interesting, whether they fail or succeed in their own right.  Clay McLeod Chapman, in The Remaking, has given us a story about ghost stories which is itself a ghost story in which the tale of … Continue reading

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Michael Ferguson’s Little Joe Superstar: The Films of Joe Dallesandro

Imagine, for a moment, that it is the 1960s – the last half of them, actually – and that you are a small-town boy attending a major Midwestern university in a major Midwestern city, where you are majoring in theater … Continue reading

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Frazetta: Painting With Fire

Frank Frazetta is probably the most influential artist of the last half century. — William Stout, Illustrator Documentaries are like the little girl with the curl in the middle of her forehead: when they are good, they are very, very … Continue reading

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Lisa Kröger and Melanie R. Anderson‘s Monster, She Wrote

Gauging the influence of women on genre fiction can be rather difficult due to years of gender bias in criticism and historical recording. As a result I was pleased to hear the announcement of Monster, She Wrote by Lisa Kröger … Continue reading

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Ray Bradbury’s Summer Morning, Summer Night

To say that Summer Morning, Summer Night is minor Ray Bradbury is, I think, to miss the point entirely. While it shares the same Green Town, Illinois setting as his legendary Something Wicked This Way Comes, the material collected here … Continue reading

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Clive Barker’s Abarat: Days of Magic, Nights of War

Sara Sutterfield Winn Penned this review. Yay sequels! Loved faces and familiar places! Well, okay, maybe not in the Abarat. This gorgeous and meaty second book, in Clive Barker’s four book series about the adventures of Candy Quackenbush through the … Continue reading

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Chaz Brenchley’s The Devil in the Dust

Despite what the church claimed and the people believed, this was still a Kingdom born of younger sons, the land-hungry and the dispossessed. Thus begins one of the more fascinating books I’ve read in a while, Chaz Brenchley’s The Devil … Continue reading

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Neverwhere at the Lifeline Theatre

In considering the works of Neil Gaiman, it is difficult to think of a contemporary writer whose stories have so completely exploited the full range of multi-media possibilities of current media technologies. From comics to  to audiobook and film, Gaiman’s stories … Continue reading

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Troy Carrol Bucher‘s Lies of Descent

So sometimes, you just cannot connect with a book. Lies of Descent is the first book in a new trilogy by Troy Carrol Bucher. It is also a volume that fails in many ways to connect with the reader. The … Continue reading

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John Barton‘s Playing Shakespeare

John Barton co-founded the Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC) with Peter Hall in 1960, and Barton has been an active director with the RSC ever since. In 1982, Barton, working with such RSC luminaries as Ian McKellen, Patrick Stewart, Judi Dench, … Continue reading

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Sharyn McCrumb’s Bimbos of the Death Sun and Zombies of the Gene Pool

Craig Clarke penned this review. Nowhere on her Web site does novelist Sharyn McCrumb mention her Edgar Allan Poe Award, the most coveted award in the mystery genre and something that most winners would be shouting from the rooftops. One … Continue reading

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Shirley Rousseau Murphy‘s Cat on the Edge

Naomi de Bruyn penned this review. In the quiet coastal town of Molena Point, cats are treated like kings and queens. People tend to drive slowly so as to avoid hitting any free-roaming cats; even the tourists observe some unspoken … Continue reading

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Kage Baker’s The Bird of the River

The late Kage Baker was one of those admirably unpredictable writers whose stories never seemed to fit into any sort of mold, whether they were part of a series or stood alone. There is, though, a kind of magic in … Continue reading

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Kage Baker’s The Anvil of the World

What do you get when you take an assassin sick of killing, a petulant half-demon and his hubba-hubba aide “Nursie,” a barely pubescent girl who would leave a marathoner in the dust, and a cook so amazing she could make … Continue reading

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Kage Baker’s The House of the Stag

Matthew Scott Wilson penned this review. One of the things I find most alluring about reading fiction, especially speculative fiction, is immersing myself in another world. For the limited time that I am reading a novel, I find myself totally … Continue reading

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Paul Green’s Encyclopedia of Weird Westerns

Craig Clarke penned this review. Traditional Westerns offer some of the best reading around, but an enthusiast also appreciates a blending of genres now and then. Westerns with crime-fiction tropes are fairly easy to find; that’s just your average historical … Continue reading

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Cherie Priest’s Four and Twenty Blackbirds

Cherie Priest is a first time novelist. However, she writes with ease and a deceptive power, like the flow of the Tennessee River through her home city of Chattanooga. Four and Twenty Blackbirds is a Southern Gothic with a hint … Continue reading

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S.M. Peters’ Whitechapel Gods

In an alternate nineteenth-century Britain, two powerful entities, emotionless and purely logical Grandfather Clock and passionate and creative Mama Engine, have conquered the Whitechapel area of London and now rule it as gods, acting through the human conduit of the … Continue reading

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Joe Nazzaro’s The Creatures of Farscape: Inside Jim Henson’s Creature Shop

What a fascinating book! I’ve long been a fan of the Henson-produced science fiction series Farscape, particularly the effort the program always put in to making the alien species that populated the Farscape universe seem, well, alien. In The Creatures … Continue reading

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Rebecca Munford’s Re-visiting Angela Carter: Texts, Contexts, Intertexts

I first discovered the works of Angela Carter when I was a teenager growing up in upstate New York. I can’t remember which book it was, though it was probably, knowing my teenage appetite for horror and gothics, The Bloody … Continue reading

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Isaac Asimov’s Azazel

Though known primarily for his works of science fiction, with such classics as the Foundation series and the Robot stories, Dr. Isaac Asimov (named Grand Master in 1988 by the Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America) was a master … Continue reading

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Isaac Asimov’s I, Robot

It’s a splendid review indeed. It really is. And if we ever discover who wrote it, we’ll give them their proper due. Really. Truly. We will. When faced with a work of the stature of I, Robot, one is pretty … Continue reading

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Ray Bradbury’s Where Everything Ends

Craig Clarke penned this review. The subtitle “The Mystery Novels of Ray Bradbury” quickly tells us what’s between the covers of Where Everything Ends, a collection of an underappreciated portion of the author’s bibliography: three crime novels written between 1985 … Continue reading

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Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling’s Troll’s Eye View: A Book of Villainous Tales

Troll’s Eye View: A Book of Villainous Tales is the third collection of fairy tale retellings for younger readers edited by the truly fabulous editorial team of Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling, the first collection being A Wolf at the … Continue reading

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Amy M. Clarke’s Ursula K. Le Guin’s Journey to Post-Feminism

Joseph Thompson penned this review. Learning about an artist is risky business. Near the end of my college career, I lost all respect for a musician I greatly admired after taking a senior seminar about this musician. The course confirmed … Continue reading

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Ray Bradbury’s The Martian Chronicles

Carter Napper penned this review. By June of 1949, Ray Bradbury was gaining recognition as one of America’s leading short story writers. He had won the O. Henry Award in 1947 and again in 1948. Bradbury’s friend Norman Corwin encouraged … Continue reading

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Steven Brust & Megan Lindholm’s The Gypsy / Steven Brust’s The Sun, the Moon, and the Stars / Boiled in Lead’s Songs From The Gypsy

Chuck Lipsig penned this magnificent, sprawling review. The novel was written from the point of view of Greg Kovacs, a struggling artist, who shared studio space with four other struggling artists. The four of them had hoped that working together … Continue reading

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Will Shetterly’s Cats Have No Lord

Kate Brown penned this review. It was not immediately clear when I began to read this book exactly how the title fit with the story. However, the characters brilliantly pull a reader in, until the question is revealed, “Why do … Continue reading

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Melissa Scott and Lisa A. Barnett’s Point Of Dreams

Sarah Meador penned this review. Point Of Dreams is basically a murder mystery. The city of Astreiant may be in a world where magic works and ghosts walk, but it’s still a mystery. That magic only serves to complicate things … Continue reading

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Frank O’Hara’s Lunch Poems

Frank O’Hara is one of those American poets who hovers on the edge of what we are pleased to call “greatness.” Perhaps he hovers there because there is something tongue-in cheek about O’Hara’s work — and, one suspects, about his … Continue reading

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Roger Zelazny’s A Night In The Lonesome October audiobook

Leona Wisoker penned this review.  All it takes is the name — Zelazny — and you have my attention. Rather like a dog presented with a favorite treat, I’m completely attentive to anything following. So when an audio book of … Continue reading

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Roger Zelazny’s The Doors of His Face, the Lamps of His Mouth and Other Stories

Although he published his first story in the early 1950s, Roger Zelazny didn’t really impact the science fiction scene until 1963. That’s when I remember reading “A Rose for Eccelsiastes” in The Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction (with their … Continue reading

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Roger Zelazny and Jane Lindskold’s Lord Demon

Patrick O’Donnell penned this review. Roger Zelazny was a master among sci-fi/fantasy writers. From his first short-story sale in 1962 to his famous Amber series, he made it his business to create worlds that were at once believable and fantastic, … Continue reading

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Jane Yolen’s Take Joy: A Book for Writers

Confession time: as a working writer, albeit one who is as yet unpublished in the fiction realm, I have a weakness for books about writing by successful writers. I have quite the collection of them, sitting atop my desk — … Continue reading

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Robin McKinley’s Deerskin

In Deerskin, Robin McKinley delves into a dark tale of royal incest, derived from Frenchman Charles Perrault’s “Donkeyskin”. At its simplest, this oft-neglected, disturbing tale revolves around a deathbed promise extracted from a King by his Queen, to marry no … Continue reading

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Robin McKinley’s Spindle’s End

Once upon a time, as the story goes, there was a princess. As an infant, she was blessed by some of the mightiest fairies in all the land, save one. That one, the most powerful and malevolent of creatures, resentful … Continue reading

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Patricia A. McKillip’s The Tower at Stony Wood

Patricia A. McKillip seems to write two kinds of novels. On the one hand, she has produced what I can only call thoughtful adventure stories, such as Riddle-Master. On the other are what I call the “mystery” stories — not … Continue reading

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Patricia A. McKillip’s The Book of Atrix Wolfe

Some of the GMR staff were having a conversation about books that are beautifully written, books whose authors obviously love the English language and use it skillfully, extravagantly, profligately, even orgiastically. Patricia McKillip’s The Book of Atrix Wolfe is on my … Continue reading

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Patricia A. McKillip’s The Bell at Sealey Head

Deborah J. Brannon penned this review. You look at the book: a woman, golden and wind-blown, spins your perception around her, a dizzying path into a sky the deep blue of the sea and down onto a wall white as … Continue reading

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Patricia A. McKillip’s The Changeling Sea

Once upon a time, there was a king who fell in love with a woman of the sea. In time, however, he married one of his own people and made her his queen. In anger, the sea woman exacted a … Continue reading

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