Category Archives: Books

Jane Frank’s Science Fiction and Fantasy Artists of the Twentieth Century: A Biographical Dictionary

Jane Frank’s Science Fiction and Fantasy Artists of the Twentieth Century is a successor volume to Robert Weinberg’s Biographical Dictionary of Science Fiction and Fantasy Artists, published in 1988. Given the labor-intensive quality of a project such as this one, … Continue reading

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Simon R. Green’s ‘Some of These Cons Go Way Back’

Next up was Harry Fabulous; handsome, charming, deeply fashionable, and all of it as fake as his constant smile. Harry showed no interest at all in the stalls, moving instead from one potential customer to another like a shark in … Continue reading

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Ray Bradbury’s They Have Not Seen The Stars: The Collected Poetry of Ray Bradbury

John Lynch penned this review. Ray Bradbury has explored mankind’s present through its future in his science-fiction novels Fahrenheit 451 and The Martian Chronicles. With his poetry collection, They Have Not Seen The Stars, Bradbury relaxes a bit, writing on … Continue reading

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Charles Finch’s The Last Passenger

The idea of writing a prequel is less than adored in many circles and fandoms, and there are a wide assortment of generally disliked examples. With The Last Passenger Charles Finch proves that one can write a good end to … Continue reading

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N. J. Dawood’s translation of Tales from the Thousand and One Nights

Brendan Foreman penned this review. As popular as they have been in the Western world, The Thousand and One Nights as a piece of literature has never been regarded very well in the Arab world. Written in its highly colloquial, … Continue reading

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Theodore Roethke’s The Far Field

American poetry has given us a host of names that everyone knows – the household words, the people we all studied in high school: Frost, Sandburg, Dickinson, Whitman, Plath. There are others known to more than aficionados, if not to … Continue reading

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Jack Zipes’ Hans Christian Andersen: The Misunderstood Storyteller

Hans Christian Andersen is quite arguably the best-known writer of fairy tales in the world, or at least that part of the world that derives from European traditions. In Hans Christian Andersen: The Misunderstood Storyteller, Jack Zipes argues that he … Continue reading

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Patricia A. McKillip’s In the Forests of Serre

Patricia A. McKillip does something in In the Forests of Serre that I don’t think I’ve ever noticed her doing before: there are recognizable elements of traditional folklore in the story. In fact, they are critically important parts of the … Continue reading

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T.E.D. Klein’s Providence After Dark and Other Writings

Providence After Dark and Other Writings collects much of T.E.D. Klein’s nonfiction. This includes his introductions, critical articles, and even reviews. There is a fair assortment in the book, and, being gathered together for the first time, this collection gives … Continue reading

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Richard Matheson’s I am Legend (Suntup Edition)

Richard Matheson has become one of the legends of horror fiction, a formative figure, and it takes only a glance at the novel I Am Legend to see why. A now classic tale of apocalypse in which the conflict is … Continue reading

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Gary K. Wolfe’s Eight Classic Science Fiction Novels of the 1960s

The Library of America’s Science Fiction: Eight Classic Novels of the 1960s is another impressive feat by editor Gary K. Wolfe. As he explains in his introductions, stories in this two volume slipcase set were chosen both for quality and … Continue reading

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Joe R. Lansdale’s Of Mice and Minestrone

The Hap & Leonard series is one of Joe R. Lansdale’s most engaging works, a series of strange and fragmented crime stories which showcase two men who care for one another like brothers and find themselves frequently in complicated situations … Continue reading

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Elizabeth Bear’s Blood and Iron

One of the freshest and most interesting developments in fantasy literature over the past decade or two has been the emergence of what I tend to call “contemporary fantasy.” Known also as “urban fantasy” or sometimes “mythic literature,” it combines … Continue reading

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Various Writers’ What’s In A Name: Doctor Who Star Tales

One of the noticeable oddities about Doctor Who as a franchise is the tendency to use and reference historical personalities. Vincent van Gogh, William Shakespeare,  Charles Dickens, and any number of royal figures have appeared on the television series. Many … Continue reading

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Eric Seward’s Revelation of the Daleks

The final novelization of classic era Doctor Who has arrived with Eric Seward’s adaptation of his own Revelation of the Daleks. This volume has been a long time coming, with over thirty years between the airing of the television story and … Continue reading

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Roger Zelazny’s Unicorn Variations

I’ve been collecting and reading this author for well over twenty years now. (Today, I received A Checklist of Roger Zelazny, a chapbook that Christopher Stephens did in 1991. Bliss — more reading to look forward to!) Even though he … Continue reading

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Camille Bacon-Smith’s Daemon Eyes

Deamon Eyes is an omnibus edition of Camille Bacon-Smith’s two novels of the half-demon Evan Davis; his father, known to mortals as Kevin Bradley; and Lily Ryan, another demon. The three set themselves up as detectives, doing business as Bradley, … Continue reading

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Carrie Vaughn’s The Immortal Conquistador

Carrie Vaugh has been writing urban fantasy for many years, and her Kitty Norville series is only one example of her work. It is a series focusing on a werewolf, and like many werewolf stories, vampires come into play. Feeling … Continue reading

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Sophie Aldred’s At Childhood’s End

There is a long history in the Doctor Who franchise of actors taking on writing credits. Colin Baker, Mathew Watterhouse, Nicholas Briggs, Tom Baker, and others have written or co-written adventures featuring their characters. Sophie Aldred has (with the assistance … Continue reading

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Max Allan Collins’ Killing Quarry

There is something nice about seeing an old character, genre, or style revived. Killing Quarry by Max Allan Collins once again delivers an adventure of his ’70s pulp character Quarry, a Vietnam veteran who finds himself dealing with frequent strange … Continue reading

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Daniel Kraus’s Blood Sugar

The point of view of a story can be the absolute greatest detail when determining how well it is told. Blood Sugar by Daniel Kraus has this element in spades. Indeed, rather than giving us merely one point of view, … Continue reading

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Michelle Birkby’s All Roads Lead to Whitechapel

Interesting new points of view for Sherlock Holmes tales are difficult, and even finding a new way to express an old point of view is impressive. Michelle Birkby, in All Roads Lead to Whitechapel, has produced a very nice mystery, … Continue reading

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Bill Willingham’s Fables: Volume 6: Homelands; Volume 7: Arabian Nights (And Days)

Bill Willingham’s wonderfully developed series about fairy tales living among us today extends two more volumes with Homelands and Arabian Nights (And Days). Homelands, which contains issues 34-41, opens with “Jack Be Nimble,” wherein Jack, ever the Trickster, lands in … Continue reading

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Mike Resnick and Joe Siclari (editors), WorldCon Guest of Honor Speeches

The World Science Fiction Convention is the most venerable of all the various annual gatherings of SF fandom, and it’s arguably the most important of them all, as it is at each Worldcon that the highest awards in SF, the … Continue reading

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J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien

‘…If you wanted to go on from the end of The Hobbit I think the ring would be your inevitable choice as the link. If then you wanted a large tale, the Ring would at once acquire a capital letter; … Continue reading

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Mike Resnick and Barry N. Malzberg, The Business of $cience Fiction: Two Insiders Discuss Writing and Publishing

This review was written by Faith J. Cormier. The Business of $cience Fiction: Two Insiders Discuss Writing and Publishing is a collection of essays from “The Resnick/Malzberg Dialogues,” a regular feature of the SFWA Bulletin. (The SFWA is the Science … Continue reading

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Mike Resnick’s Stalking the Unicorn: A Fable of Tonight

MISSING: One unicorn. Answers to the name of “Larkspur.” Distinguishing marks: Perfect ruby embedded in forehead. Last seen in the company of Mürgenstürm, elf, whose job was to guard said creature. Priceless. Hefty reward. THE SUSPECTS: Mürgenstürm: His story doesn’t … Continue reading

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Mike Resnick’s The Other Teddy Roosevelts

This review was written by Faith J. Cormier. Alternative History — the literary artifice of postulating that some historical event either never occurred or had a different outcome than it did in real life and deducing how society would have … Continue reading

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Mike Resnick’s Dragon America

I’d bet that early colonists were surprised, even frightened, by some of the strange new creatures America had to offer. But I’m sure nothing surprised them more than seeing dragons soaring overhead. Wait, you never heard about the dragons? Looks … Continue reading

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Mike Resnick’s The Doctor and the Rough Rider

Mike Resnick, as I’m sure I’ve stated before somewhere – probably here – is one of those writers who should not need an introduction. He’s one of most prolific – and versatile — writers in science fiction, and one of … Continue reading

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Mike Resnick’s The Doctor and the Dinosaurs

The Doctor and the Dinosaurs is the latest in Mike Resnick’s Weird West Tales, featuring Doc Holliday, Tom Edison, Ned Buntline, and, back for an encore, Teddy Roosevelt. And once again, Goyathlay, known to the white man as Geronimo, is … Continue reading

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Mike Resnick’s The Buntline Special: A Weird West Tale

Whee, that was a fun read! Ever hear the story of the gunfight at OK Corral? I’m sure you have, as it’s well-known aspect of American culture, to the point that there as even a Star Trek — The Original … Continue reading

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Mike Resnick’s Santiago: A Myth of the Far Future

“They say his father was a comet and his mother a cosmic wind, that he juggles planets as if they were feathers and wrestles with black holes just to work up an appetite. They say he never sleeps, and that … Continue reading

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Bill Willingham’s Fables: Storybook Love, March of the Wooden Soldiers, and The Mean Seasons

These three volumes continue Bill Willingham’s fascinating tale of fairy tale denizens exiled to our own world, a story he began spinning with Legends in Exile and Animal Farm. Spanning issues 11-33 (albeit slightly out of order), these volumes provide … Continue reading

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Michael Andre-Driussi’s Lexicon Urthus: A Dictionary of the Urth Cycle; The Wizard Knight Companion: A Lexicon for Gene Wolfe’s The Knight and The Wizard

One of the notable features of Gene Wolfe’s The Book of the New Sun> is the vocabulary. (Well, there’s more of course — it’s a notable cycle on a number of fronts.) When I reviewed the Urth Cycle (Andre-Driussi’s term), … Continue reading

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Gideon Marcus’ Rediscovery: Science Fiction by Women (1958-1963)

Gideon Marcus’ collection Rediscovery: Science Fiction by Women (1958-1963) represents a narrow slice of writing from a historically marginalized group within the genre. Featuring stories by both forgotten and known authors, this volume plumbed the depths of old magazines to find … Continue reading

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Nicholas Meyer’s The Adventure of the Peculiar Protocols

Nicholas Meyer is well known for a wide assortment of projects, not the least of which is his first Sherlock Holmes pastiche in The Seven Percent Solution. This story provided an alternate reason for Holmes hiatus, and was a runaway … Continue reading

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C. J. Cherryh’s Rider at the Gate

C. J. Cherryh is known mainly as a science-fiction writer who sometimes writes fantasy. And then there are the times that she seems to be doing both at the same time. Rider at the Gate, the first of her Finisterre … Continue reading

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C. J. Cherryh’s Cloud’s Rider

Cloud’s Rider, the second of C. J. Cherryh’s Finisterre novels, takes up where Rider at the Gate left off: Danny fisher is taking Brionne, Carlo and Randy Goss, the only survivors of Tarmin village, to Evergreen, the next village up … Continue reading

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Mercedes Lackey’s The Case of the Spellbound Child

Another Sherlock Holmes tale has been released, in the form of Mercedes Lackey’s The Case of the Spellbound Child. Lackey is a very experienced author, known for her Valdemar series and this, the Elemental Masters, series amongst others. She has … Continue reading

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C. J. Cherryh and Jane S. Fancher’s Alliance Rising

Alliance Rising is approximately the umpteenth book set in Cherryh’s Alliance-Union Universe, a space opera series that starts on near-future Earth and extends far into the future and a good way into our galactic neighborhood. It takes place, as the … Continue reading

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MC Beaton’s Beating About the Bush

M.C Beaton’s Agatha Raisin series has been around for decades, and has permuted into both the television and radio series. The titular character, a public relations expert who finds herself increasingly drawn into crime solving, serves as an intelligent but … Continue reading

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Chloe Neill’s The Wicked Hour

Long running series can be a problem for the reader. Jumping into a setting late can be rather difficult, and jumping into a series late even more so. Chloe Neill gave readers the Chicagoland Vampires series years ago, and its … Continue reading

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H.G Wells’ The Island of Doctor Moreau

There is something to be said for the extremely fine additions being put out at small presses today. An example of such would be the new edition of H.G. Wells’ The Island of Doctor Moreau released by Beehive Books, featuring … Continue reading

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Various Authors’ Doctor Who:The Target Storybook

A Doctor Who anthology typically involves multiple incarnations of the doctor, and multiple authors telling stories. In the case of The Target Storybook the reader is given a collection of 15 stories, each relating to one Doctor or another era, usually … Continue reading

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John Miller’s Tales of the Tattooed

Themed anthologies are an excellent way for a reader to discover unexpected takes on an old idea. Editor John Miller’s Tales of the Tattooed is an excellent example of this, with stories and authors that are anywhere from household names … Continue reading

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Andrew Blauner’s The Peanuts Papers

Peanuts was and arguably still is a key piece of the history of sequential art. Charles Schulz’ work of more than fifty years proved exceptional and is remembered to this day. The Peanuts Papers is editor Andrew Blauner’s attempt to … Continue reading

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Algernon Blackwood’s Roarings From Further Out: Four Weird Novellas by Algernon Blackwood

Algernon Blackwood is a  formative influence in the weird fiction genre, with his works “The Wendigo” and “The Willows” being staples. Editor Xavier Aldana Reyes collects not only those stories but two less well-known novellas by the author in Roarings … Continue reading

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Eric Saward’s Doctor Who: Resurrection of the Daleks

There have long been a number of noticeable gaps in the novelizations of the original television series of Doctor Who. With Eric Saward now the novelising his own Resurrection of the Daleks, those gaps have become one fewer. The book … Continue reading

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Marc Luber and Brett Cohen’s Stuff Every Sushi Lover Should Know

In guide books there are typically the introductory and the exhaustive. Brett Cohen and Mark Luber’s Stuff Every Sushi Lover Should Know falls in the former category. It does so, however, by pressing an impressive amount of information into a … Continue reading

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