Category Archives: Books

Bill Willingham’s Fables: Volume 6: Homelands; Volume 7: Arabian Nights (And Days)

Bill Willingham’s wonderfully developed series about fairy tales living among us today extends two more volumes with Homelands and Arabian Nights (And Days). Homelands, which contains issues 34-41, opens with “Jack Be Nimble,” wherein Jack, ever the Trickster, lands in … Continue reading

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Mike Resnick and Joe Siclari (editors), WorldCon Guest of Honor Speeches

The World Science Fiction Convention is the most venerable of all the various annual gatherings of SF fandom, and it’s arguably the most important of them all, as it is at each Worldcon that the highest awards in SF, the … Continue reading

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Mike Resnick and Barry N. Malzberg, The Business of $cience Fiction: Two Insiders Discuss Writing and Publishing

This review was written by Faith J. Cormier. The Business of $cience Fiction: Two Insiders Discuss Writing and Publishing is a collection of essays from “The Resnick/Malzberg Dialogues,” a regular feature of the SFWA Bulletin. (The SFWA is the Science … Continue reading

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Mike Resnick’s Stalking the Unicorn: A Fable of Tonight

MISSING: One unicorn. Answers to the name of “Larkspur.” Distinguishing marks: Perfect ruby embedded in forehead. Last seen in the company of Mürgenstürm, elf, whose job was to guard said creature. Priceless. Hefty reward. THE SUSPECTS: Mürgenstürm: His story doesn’t … Continue reading

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Mike Resnick’s The Other Teddy Roosevelts

This review was written by Faith J. Cormier. Alternative History — the literary artifice of postulating that some historical event either never occurred or had a different outcome than it did in real life and deducing how society would have … Continue reading

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Mike Resnick’s Dragon America

I’d bet that early colonists were surprised, even frightened, by some of the strange new creatures America had to offer. But I’m sure nothing surprised them more than seeing dragons soaring overhead. Wait, you never heard about the dragons? Looks … Continue reading

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Mike Resnick’s The Doctor and the Rough Rider

Mike Resnick, as I’m sure I’ve stated before somewhere – probably here – is one of those writers who should not need an introduction. He’s one of most prolific – and versatile — writers in science fiction, and one of … Continue reading

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Mike Resnick’s The Doctor and the Dinosaurs

The Doctor and the Dinosaurs is the latest in Mike Resnick’s Weird West Tales, featuring Doc Holliday, Tom Edison, Ned Buntline, and, back for an encore, Teddy Roosevelt. And once again, Goyathlay, known to the white man as Geronimo, is … Continue reading

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Mike Resnick’s The Buntline Special: A Weird West Tale

Whee, that was a fun read! Ever hear the story of the gunfight at OK Corral? I’m sure you have, as it’s well-known aspect of American culture, to the point that there as even a Star Trek — The Original … Continue reading

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Mike Resnick’s Santiago: A Myth of the Far Future

“They say his father was a comet and his mother a cosmic wind, that he juggles planets as if they were feathers and wrestles with black holes just to work up an appetite. They say he never sleeps, and that … Continue reading

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Bill Willingham’s Fables: Storybook Love, March of the Wooden Soldiers, and The Mean Seasons

These three volumes continue Bill Willingham’s fascinating tale of fairy tale denizens exiled to our own world, a story he began spinning with Legends in Exile and Animal Farm. Spanning issues 11-33 (albeit slightly out of order), these volumes provide … Continue reading

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Michael Andre-Driussi’s Lexicon Urthus: A Dictionary of the Urth Cycle; The Wizard Knight Companion: A Lexicon for Gene Wolfe’s The Knight and The Wizard

One of the notable features of Gene Wolfe’s The Book of the New Sun> is the vocabulary. (Well, there’s more of course — it’s a notable cycle on a number of fronts.) When I reviewed the Urth Cycle (Andre-Driussi’s term), … Continue reading

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Gideon Marcus’ Rediscovery: Science Fiction by Women (1958-1963)

Gideon Marcus’ collection Rediscovery: Science Fiction by Women (1958-1963) represents a narrow slice of writing from a historically marginalized group within the genre. Featuring stories by both forgotten and known authors, this volume plumbed the depths of old magazines to find … Continue reading

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Nicholas Meyer’s The Adventure of the Peculiar Protocols

Nicholas Meyer is well known for a wide assortment of projects, not the least of which is his first Sherlock Holmes pastiche in The Seven Percent Solution. This story provided an alternate reason for Holmes hiatus, and was a runaway … Continue reading

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C. J. Cherryh’s Rider at the Gate

C. J. Cherryh is known mainly as a science-fiction writer who sometimes writes fantasy. And then there are the times that she seems to be doing both at the same time. Rider at the Gate, the first of her Finisterre … Continue reading

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C. J. Cherryh’s Cloud’s Rider

Cloud’s Rider, the second of C. J. Cherryh’s Finisterre novels, takes up where Rider at the Gate left off: Danny fisher is taking Brionne, Carlo and Randy Goss, the only survivors of Tarmin village, to Evergreen, the next village up … Continue reading

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Mercedes Lackey’s The Case of the Spellbound Child

Another Sherlock Holmes tale has been released, in the form of Mercedes Lackey’s The Case of the Spellbound Child. Lackey is a very experienced author, known for her Valdemar series and this, the Elemental Masters, series amongst others. She has … Continue reading

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C. J. Cherryh and Jane S. Fancher’s Alliance Rising

Alliance Rising is approximately the umpteenth book set in Cherryh’s Alliance-Union Universe, a space opera series that starts on near-future Earth and extends far into the future and a good way into our galactic neighborhood. It takes place, as the … Continue reading

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MC Beaton’s Beating About the Bush

M.C Beaton’s Agatha Raisin series has been around for decades, and has permuted into both the television and radio series. The titular character, a public relations expert who finds herself increasingly drawn into crime solving, serves as an intelligent but … Continue reading

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Chloe Neill’s The Wicked Hour

Long running series can be a problem for the reader. Jumping into a setting late can be rather difficult, and jumping into a series late even more so. Chloe Neill gave readers the Chicagoland Vampires series years ago, and its … Continue reading

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H.G Wells’ The Island of Doctor Moreau

There is something to be said for the extremely fine additions being put out at small presses today. An example of such would be the new edition of H.G. Wells’ The Island of Doctor Moreau released by Beehive Books, featuring … Continue reading

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Various Authors’ Doctor Who:The Target Storybook

A Doctor Who anthology typically involves multiple incarnations of the doctor, and multiple authors telling stories. In the case of The Target Storybook the reader is given a collection of 15 stories, each relating to one Doctor or another era, usually … Continue reading

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John Miller’s Tales of the Tattooed

Themed anthologies are an excellent way for a reader to discover unexpected takes on an old idea. Editor John Miller’s Tales of the Tattooed is an excellent example of this, with stories and authors that are anywhere from household names … Continue reading

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Andrew Blauner’s The Peanuts Papers

Peanuts was and arguably still is a key piece of the history of sequential art. Charles Schulz’ work of more than fifty years proved exceptional and is remembered to this day. The Peanuts Papers is editor Andrew Blauner’s attempt to … Continue reading

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Algernon Blackwood’s Roarings From Further Out: Four Weird Novellas by Algernon Blackwood

Algernon Blackwood is a  formative influence in the weird fiction genre, with his works “The Wendigo” and “The Willows” being staples. Editor Xavier Aldana Reyes collects not only those stories but two less well-known novellas by the author in Roarings … Continue reading

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Eric Saward’s Doctor Who: Resurrection of the Daleks

There have long been a number of noticeable gaps in the novelizations of the original television series of Doctor Who. With Eric Saward now the novelising his own Resurrection of the Daleks, those gaps have become one fewer. The book … Continue reading

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Marc Luber and Brett Cohen’s Stuff Every Sushi Lover Should Know

In guide books there are typically the introductory and the exhaustive. Brett Cohen and Mark Luber’s Stuff Every Sushi Lover Should Know falls in the former category. It does so, however, by pressing an impressive amount of information into a … Continue reading

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Helen Ward’s The Town Mouse and the Country Mouse

You’ve undoubtedly heard this story, or at the very least heard of it, probably under some variation of “The Country Mouse and the City Mouse,” or the reverse. It’s a well-loved children’s story that has received innumerable treatments throughout the … Continue reading

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Steven Brust’s Cowboy Feng’s Space Bar and Grill

I’m a fiddler. I like Steven Brust. I love most any novel with folk music as a theme, particularly when musicians are the characters. So why the fuck did I find Cowboy Feng’s Space Bar and Grill to be not … Continue reading

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Ramsey Campbell’s The Grin of the Dark

Much of what we call comedy is not quite as harmless or as amusing as we like to picture it. From the classic pratfall to the traditional Punch and Judy show to the slapstick — a stage prop which gave … Continue reading

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Ursula K. Le Guin’s Always Coming Home (Author’s Expanded Edition)

The collection of material relating to a respected novel can be difficult, but the library of America usually produces excellent results. Always Coming Home: Author’s Expanded Edition brings together much material relating to the title story by Ursula Le Guin. … Continue reading

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Orson Scott Card, Scott Brick, Aaron Johnston and Emily Janice Card’s Posing as People – Three Stories, Three Plays

Adaptations for the stage or screen are often problematical, as witness the critical brickbats thrown several years ago over the relative merits of the screen renderings of The Fellowship of the Ring and Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone. Stage … Continue reading

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Guy Frasier-Sampson’s What Would Wimsey Do

A tribute to Golden Age mystery fiction is always welcomed, and a specific tribute to Peter Wimsey is a welcome surprise. What Would Wimsey Do? is Guy Fraser-Samson’s tribute to that great detectives, in the form of a more contemporary … Continue reading

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Steve Rasnic Tem’s The Night Doctor and Other Stories

Centipede Press is known for putting out quality volumes, and The Night Doctor and Other Stories by Steve Rasnic Tem is no exception. A long-running, highly celebrated author, Rasnic here offers a collection of his more recent short stories, including … Continue reading

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Ray Bradbury’s The Halloween Tree

William P. Simmons Penned this review. “Halloween. Sly does it. Tiptoe catspaws. Slide and creep. But why? What for? How? When! Where did it all begin?” In his typically enlightening and always entertaining style, Ray Bradbury puts his cold hand … Continue reading

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Clay McLeod Chapman’s The Remaking

Stories about stories can be interesting, whether they fail or succeed in their own right.  Clay McLeod Chapman, in The Remaking, has given us a story about ghost stories which is itself a ghost story in which the tale of … Continue reading

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Michael Ferguson’s Little Joe Superstar: The Films of Joe Dallesandro

Imagine, for a moment, that it is the 1960s – the last half of them, actually – and that you are a small-town boy attending a major Midwestern university in a major Midwestern city, where you are majoring in theater … Continue reading

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Frazetta: Painting With Fire

Frank Frazetta is probably the most influential artist of the last half century. — William Stout, Illustrator Documentaries are like the little girl with the curl in the middle of her forehead: when they are good, they are very, very … Continue reading

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Lisa Kröger and Melanie R. Anderson‘s Monster, She Wrote

Gauging the influence of women on genre fiction can be rather difficult due to years of gender bias in criticism and historical recording. As a result I was pleased to hear the announcement of Monster, She Wrote by Lisa Kröger … Continue reading

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Arkady Martine’s A Memory Called Empire, Book One of the Teixcalaanli Empire series

First I must note that I now can only experience novels in audiobook format as two years ago I suffered severe head trauma that rendered my ability to follow a written narrative of any reasonable length impossible. I can read … Continue reading

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Ray Bradbury’s Summer Morning, Summer Night

To say that Summer Morning, Summer Night is minor Ray Bradbury is, I think, to miss the point entirely. While it shares the same Green Town, Illinois setting as his legendary Something Wicked This Way Comes, the material collected here … Continue reading

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Clive Barker’s Abarat: Days of Magic, Nights of War

Sara Sutterfield Winn Penned this review. Yay sequels! Loved faces and familiar places! Well, okay, maybe not in the Abarat. This gorgeous and meaty second book, in Clive Barker’s four book series about the adventures of Candy Quackenbush through the … Continue reading

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Chaz Brenchley’s The Devil in the Dust

Despite what the church claimed and the people believed, this was still a Kingdom born of younger sons, the land-hungry and the dispossessed. Thus begins one of the more fascinating books I’ve read in a while, Chaz Brenchley’s The Devil … Continue reading

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Neverwhere at the Lifeline Theatre

In considering the works of Neil Gaiman, it is difficult to think of a contemporary writer whose stories have so completely exploited the full range of multi-media possibilities of current media technologies. From comics to  to audiobook and film, Gaiman’s stories … Continue reading

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Troy Carrol Bucher‘s Lies of Descent

So sometimes, you just cannot connect with a book. Lies of Descent is the first book in a new trilogy by Troy Carrol Bucher. It is also a volume that fails in many ways to connect with the reader. The … Continue reading

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John Barton‘s Playing Shakespeare

John Barton co-founded the Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC) with Peter Hall in 1960, and Barton has been an active director with the RSC ever since. In 1982, Barton, working with such RSC luminaries as Ian McKellen, Patrick Stewart, Judi Dench, … Continue reading

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Sharyn McCrumb’s Bimbos of the Death Sun and Zombies of the Gene Pool

Craig Clarke penned this review. Nowhere on her Web site does novelist Sharyn McCrumb mention her Edgar Allan Poe Award, the most coveted award in the mystery genre and something that most winners would be shouting from the rooftops. One … Continue reading

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Shirley Rousseau Murphy‘s Cat on the Edge

Naomi de Bruyn penned this review. In the quiet coastal town of Molena Point, cats are treated like kings and queens. People tend to drive slowly so as to avoid hitting any free-roaming cats; even the tourists observe some unspoken … Continue reading

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Kage Baker’s The Bird of the River

The late Kage Baker was one of those admirably unpredictable writers whose stories never seemed to fit into any sort of mold, whether they were part of a series or stood alone. There is, though, a kind of magic in … Continue reading

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Kage Baker’s The Anvil of the World

What do you get when you take an assassin sick of killing, a petulant half-demon and his hubba-hubba aide “Nursie,” a barely pubescent girl who would leave a marathoner in the dust, and a cook so amazing she could make … Continue reading

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