A Kinrowan Estate story: Our Library Card Catalogue

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A library catalogue is an index of all bibliographic items found in a library such as the one here at Kinrowan Estate. Our catalogue covers several hundred thousand or so books, chapbooks, maps and even art. The Catalogue includes data about the physical location of items. For instance, the extensive collection of culinary-related material that the Kitchen staff has in their extensive library space (which is also their break room), the Estate Gardener’s collection is kept in his library (which includes centuries of Estate Gardener journals and gardening and animal husbandry material going back a very long time).

We even include the personal libraries of the permanent staff here so that their collections can be used by staffers. Indeed we ask them if this will be permissible when The Steward does their final hiring interview. If they enthusiastically say yes, it counts a lot towards being hired.

Any book or other item entering the permanent collection, no more than a few hundred each year as space is limited (even the Estate chapel, unused since The Restoration, is now part of the Library), is inventoried: author(s), title, subject, date, type of media and even language the works in, are all part of the information on the card.

Now that’s after a Several Annie reads the book and summarizes the contents in a single paragraph that will be entered on the card, so that Kinrowan Estate staff and visitors alike can get an idea of what the work is like. We expect a fair but opinionated summary.

That only applies to material we’ve ordered specifically for here. Works sent here unbidden that aren’t picked up for review rarely make over the threshold, as at least one community member must be enthusiastic enough about it to recommend it for inclusion. Oh, it might end up in a pile to read later or a staffer might find it worth keeping but doesn’t recommend it be added to the Library collection.

Every a decade the group of Several Annies here then get the task of checking the card catalog against the actual item. Yes, we’re making sure it’s still there, but every item has a geas, a traditional Gaelic prohibition against removal from a particular place without permission of a proper Library staffer, so items simply don’t disappear. They’re also checking to see what condition it’s in as some of the older items either need work or, in the case of heavily used books, need to be replaced if possible. That gets noted into our Master Catalogue, forty thick oversized volumes with a page for everything in the Card Catalog plus a notation on its condition. The condition and status information’s only a few lines long but it’s invaluable as a safeguard against forgetting what happened to a work that’s been here for centuries.

The Annies are assisted by the staffer who has a separate collection, say Bela whose collection is exclusively in French and Hungarian, which means the Several Annie must speak one of those languages or receive assistance from a staffer fluent in one of those tongues. Those are relatively quick tasks as there’s rarely more than a thousand volumes to be checked.

(The catalogue for Fey material we have here is maintain by Laith as only a Truebood could possibly understand the convoluted system that their Librarians use.)

And of course The Annies are learning the taxonomic structure of books and other media which means they’re assimilating the structures underlying information itself. They may never work somewhere else which has a card catalogue, hard copy or digital, but they’ll know how information is structured better than anyone who hasn’t grasped the fundamentals of it.

Now let me show you our card catalogue. It’s handcrafted out of white oak by an Estate carpenter working from plans we got in 1885 from the office of Thomas Dewey himself. He built extra space into the wall where it lives, so it’s got room enough for centuries to come…

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About Diverse Voices

Diverse Voices is our catch-all for writers and other staffers who did but a few reviews or other writings for us. They are credited at the beginning of the actual writing if we know who they are which we don’t always.

It also includes material by writers that first appeared in the Sleeping Hedgehog, our in-house newsletter for staff and readers here. Some material is drawn from Folk Tales, Mostly Folk and Roots & Branches, three other publications we’ve donedone the centuries.

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