What’s New for the 25th of February: Aaron Copland’s ‘Hoe Down’, Wild China, identity in science fiction, ‘hedgehog highways’ and other neat stuff

He tried to reconstruct the story in his mind, but it kept getting confused, bleeding into itself like watercolors. ― Catherynne M. Valente’s The Orphan’s Tale: In the Night Garden

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If you like Irish whiskey, I’ve got a definite treat for you as several bottles of Quiet Man 8 Year Old Single Malt came in from our Dublin Agent and the Casker site noted ‘that it is distilled through traditional Irish pot stills and aged for eight years in oak barrels before being re-casked in first-fill bourbon barrels.’ Shall I serve you up a dram, neat of course?

I’m not quite ready for you, so let’s give you a bit of a story to listen to while I finish off this edition. ‘The Girl in the Garden’ from the Sirens recording by SJ Tucker does this nicely. It tells the tale of the orphan in Catherynne Valente’s The Orphan’s Tale:  In The Night Garden. If you like what Tucker does here, you’ll love this work by Valente, the first of two volumes with  the second being The Orphan’s Tale: The Cities of Coin and Spice. There are many stories told here, all brilliant, in a metanarrative that connects everything together.

So now let’s look at this edition, which has many tales for you — even music tells its own tale if you pay attention carefully…

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Cat had, not a look but a listen to Rita Mae Brown’s Crazy Like a Fox audiobook: ‘It’s a joy to listen to, with a skilled narrator, great setting, compelling mystery, and distinctive characters, both human and otherwise. Highly recommended, as are the previous audiobooks in this series, which are all read by the author as well.’

John Has a look at a book by contradancer and historian Allison Thompson: ‘The Blind Harper Dances: Modern English Country Dances set to airs by Turlough O’Carolan: ‘This book is at once fascinating and difficult to review. The fascination lies in the idea of combining the music of Turlough O’Carolan with modern English country dances. The difficulty lies in my own lack of experience in the world of choreography, which renders me unable to offer objective criticism or judgment to this project. Having said that, the work is an interesting collection in its own right.’

Robert has a look at a work of fantasy? Science fiction? Both? Not either? See what he has to say about Nalo Hopkinson’s The New Moon’s Arms: ‘Nalo Hopkinson gave a speech (“Looking for Clues,” reprinted in The James Tiptree Award Anthology 3) in which she addressed one of science fiction’s quandaries with great wit and eloquence. The thrust of her remarks involved the problem of finding someone she, a Caribbean woman of mixed, mostly non-white ancestry, could identify with in stories written usually from a white, male, mostly middle-class point of view.’

And speaking of questions of identity and the James Tiptree Awards, Robert has a look at the first three anthologies of those prize winners. First, Volumes 1 and 2, followed by Volume 3: ‘Tiptree’s career, as much as her writing, led to the creation in 1991 of the James Tiptree, Jr. Award by Pat Murphy and Karen Fowler. As Murphy says in her introduction to the first anthology, “We did it to make trouble. To shake things up. . . . And to honor the woman who startled the science fiction world by making people suddenly rethink their assumptions about what women and men could do.”’

We finish out our books section with an announcement by Richard Thompson: ‘RT is excited to announce the title of his book: Beeswing: Britain, Folk Rock and the End of the 60s. Due for publication in Autumn 2019, Beeswing is a memoir of musical discovery, personal revelation, and social history written by Thompson with journalist and author Scott Timberg. In the title, Thompson will describe how this “intense and fertile” time in Britain led to a spiritual crisis both personal and culture-wide. The book will also detail his conversion to Sufi mysticism, the legendary partnership with wife Linda, years of musical experimentation, and how he wrote some of the “saddest and most emotionally resonant” songs in pop-music history.’

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Robert brings us something out of the ordinary for our film section this week: a documentary series from the BBC, Wild China: ‘I have a confession to make: I’ve become addicted to the BBC nature series on Netflix. It’s probably the natural result of a boyhood spent poking around in the empty lots and forest preserves around my childhood home, seeing what was there to see, aided and abetted by a father who encouraged my curiosity. One of the better series from BBC is Wild China, which examines not only the wildlife of a vast and highly variable country, but also the geography, geology, and the attitudes of the human populations.’2C543E11-A245-4D39-B1E1-8507614B4A2A

Jay Ungar and Molly Mason’s Harvest Home: Music For All Seasons garners accolades from Brendan: ‘This is an amazing CD that manages not only to pay tribute to the rural style of life but the entire field of American traditional music as well. Ungar and Mason have created a unique blend of orchestral and folk music that manages to preserve the integrity of each style while enhancing each other.’

Jackalope’s Dances with Rabbits gets the wholehearted approval of Cat but comes with a caveat:’ Let me start this review off by saying that most of what the musician who created Jackalope, R. Carlos Nakai, plays leaves me terribly bored. Yes, bored. Bored quite stiff. Even the other Jackalope albums that I’ve heard over the years were not very interesting for me. But Dances with Rabbits has had more playings in this household that I can count as it simply has not a less than stellar cut on it.’

A recording by Amarillis which has the aforementioned Allison Thompson on accordion and concertin getd high praise from veteran contradancer Gary: ‘Waltzing in the Trees is a delightful record that brings lively contra dance music into your home.’

As Richard Thompson noted above, he has a book coming this Fall, so let’s have this reviewer tell you about one of his legendary boxsets: ‘What can you say about a musician whose career began more than 40 years ago and whose creative and physical energies are still going strong? If the artist in question is Richard Thompson, you needn’t say anything. Just open the cover of the career-spanning box set Walking On A Wire: 1968-2009 and marvel.’

Jo wrote a review of the Labyrinth recording by a band created by Scots fiddler Alasdair Fraser: ‘All of the members in Skyedance are consummate musicians, who have honed their craft to excellence. It is pure pleasure to hear these six phenomenal performers work together with such precision and craftsmanship.’

Popcorn Behavior’s Hot Contra Dance Tunes, Journeywork and Strangest Dream meets with the approval of Naomi: ‘It is rather disconcerting at first to listen to this group. The music is impeccable and surpasses much of what I have heard in my life. This in itself is not all that remarkable. However, when you realize that the musicians are only 10, 13, and 14 years of age, it kind of makes you suck back and reload, if you know what I mean. These Vermont youngsters are all musical marvels who have been playing together for years!’

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Today’s What Not has a rather spiky subject. Now, you may be aware that just about every continent has a mammal that has found a way to protect itself with spines. New World porcupines, as might be expected, inhabit the Americas, while Old World porcupines are found in southern Europe, western and southern Asia, and Africa. Madagascar even has its own version, the tenrec, which is not related to any of the others. The one that has captured our hearts here at Green Man Review, of course, is the hedgehog — not the long-eared hedgehog of the Arabian desert that eats, among other things, snakes, but our own little fellow native to Britain. (If the name of our in-house newsletter, The Sleeping Hedgehog wasn’t a dead give-away — well, we couldn’t have made it much plainer. We’ve even commented on a hedgehog puppet.) Sadly, like so many other animals, our native hedgehog is having trouble adapting to urbanization — fences and walls have put a crimp in its normal wanderings, which has not had a good result. However, one man has decided to do something about that, and his solution is quite down-to-earth and simple. You can read about Barnes Hedgehogs and ‘hedgehog highways’ here.

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So I’ve got some music for you that I think fits pretty much any season. It’s Michele Walther and Irina Behrendt playing Aaron Copland’s ‘Hoe Down’from Rodeo from his Rodeo album. I sourced it off a Smithsonian Institution music archive which has no details where or when it was recorded which surprised me given how good they usually are at such things.

About Iain Nicholas Mackenzie

I’m the Librarian for the Kinrowan Estate. I do love fresh brewed teas, curling, English mysteries and will often be playing Scandinavian or Celtic  music here in the Library here in Kinrowan Hall if the Neverending Session is elsewhere.

I’m a violinist too, so you’ll me playing in various contradance band such as Chasing Fireflies and Mouse in the Cupboard as well as backing my wife Catherine up on yearly Christmas season tours in the Nordic countries.

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